From the Age of Elegence

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Launch Slideshow

An annual event in Hong Kong since 2012, the Age of Elegance selling exhibition once again includes a carefully curated selection of European Paintings, Sculpture, Silver and Fabergé in Hong Kong. The highly curated exhibition will also include, for the first time, an important group of objects by Carl Fabergé, the world-renowned jeweller of the Russian Tsars. The collection is available for immediate purchase at the exhibition. Click ahead to browse the collection hightlights.

Age of Elegance – European Paintings, Sculptures, Silver and Fabergé

30 Sep – 5 Oct | Hong Kong

From the Age of Elegence

  • A Fabergé Gold, Silver-gilt, Enamel Seed-pearl and Hardstone Timepiece, Workmaster Michael Perchin, St. Petersburg, 1899 – 1903.
    The House of Fabergé remains world-renowned for their luxurious creations and the craftsmanship unsurpassed in the century since its end. This clock, made in the workshop of Michael Perchin, Fabergé’s most famous and highly-regarded goldsmith, is a fine example of the firm’s creative. Combination of materials, with rich Russian hardstone mounted in enamelled gold set with seed pearls.



  • A Fabergé Silver Bellpush, Moscow, 1899-1908.
    Realistically cast and chased as a wild boar, his snout with cabochon garnet pushpiece, struck with K. Fabergé in Cyrillic beneath the Imperial Warrant.

  • Raoul Dufy (1877–1953), Feuillages et Perroquets, Circa 1929. Gouache on Paper.
    Feuillages et Perroquets recalls Dufy’s celebrated mural designs in its unusual perspective and abundant motifs; the current work features a combination of luscious tropical leaves and beautiful parrots. Raoul Dufy was a celebrated French painter – alongside his brother, Jean, he created a joyfully coloured and light-filled body of work imbued with a sense of joie de vivre. He studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris and originally worked in a primarily Fauvist style alongside Henri Matisse, André Derain and Maurice de Vlaminck. Dufy invested in a studio in Vence in the South of France, drawn to the area by the strength of the sun and the particular bright quality of the light. From 1920, he began increasingly to depict scenes of social and sporting life in France and England, in particular regattas and equestrian events. He became famous for his tapestry, mural and ceramic designs as well as for his painting and is represented in all the major museums around the world.



  • Louis Sauvageau, Nymph Holding a Bird's Nest, White Marble.
    The Nymph holding a bird’s nest is a rare and exceptional marble by French sculptor Louis Sauvageau. It is exquisitely carved, and leaves a lasting impression of pure innocence and ethereal beauty.



  • An Imperial Fabergé Gem-set Silver Casket, Moscow, 1908-1917.
    By Carl Fabergé, the world-renowned jeweller of the Russian Tsars, this silver and jewelled casket was once presented by Emperor Nicholas II to Theobald von Bethmann-Hollweg (1856-1921), Chancellor of the German Empire, in 1913.



  • Antonio Ponce, Still Life of Hollyhocks and Marigolds in a Glass Vase upon a Stone Base; Still Life of Marigolds, Jasmine and Morning Glory in a Glass Vase upon a Stone Base, Circa 1650, Oil on Canvas, A Pair.
    This pair of highly refined and detailed still lifes was painted in Madrid in around 1650 by Antonio Ponce, one of the leading Spanish still life painters of his day. The 17th century witnessed the Golden Age of Spanish Painting, led by the work of artists such as Velasquez, Ribera, Murillo and Zurbaran, as well as the development of the highly specialised art of still life painting, which also saw its greatest flourishing during this time.

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