View full screen - View 1 of Lot 50. Recto: A landscape with two figures in the foreground Verso: A riverscape with trees in the foreground.
50

Anthonie Waterloo

Recto: A landscape with two figures in the foreground Verso: A riverscape with trees in the foreground

Anthonie Waterloo

Anthonie Waterloo

Recto: A landscape with two figures in the foreground Verso: A riverscape with trees in the foreground

Recto: A landscape with two figures in the foreground Verso: A riverscape with trees in the foreground

Anthonie Waterloo

Lille 1609 - 1690 Utrecht

Recto: A landscape with two figures in the foreground

Verso: A riverscape with trees in the foreground


Black chalk, watercolor and gouache, heightened with white (recto and verso)

148 by 181 mm

Window mounted to a modern decorative mount. There is water staining to the upper edge and some buckling to the sheet. There is evidence of minor surface dirt and some rubbing/abrasions to the surface, both recto and verso. There is an old repair to the lower right corner. Sold in a decorative frame.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

This rare, double-sided sheet is one of the most lyrical and atmospheric of the small group of landscape drawings in which Waterloo employed an astonishingly individual technique, combining chalk, watercolour, gouache and in some cases also charcoal soaked in linseed oil, to create an extremely original effect. No records survive to suggest that the artist served a traditional apprenticeship, suggesting that he might have been self-taught; if true, this may partly explain his unusual, highly personal technique.


Amongst the best of Waterloo's other known drawings of this type are the two sheets formerly in the collection of the British Rail Pension Fund,1 the Landscape with a Bridge, in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge,2 and another exhibited at Colnaghi in 1960.


1. Both sold New York, Sotheby's, one 23 January 2001, lot 148, the other 8 January 1991, lot 121

2. Cambridge, The Fitzwilliam Museum, inv. no. P.D. 893-1963