View 1 of Lot 86. The Zuiderspui with the Drommedaris, Enkhuizen.
View 1 of Lot 86. The Zuiderspui with the Drommedaris, Enkhuizen.
86

Cornelis Springer

The Zuiderspui with the Drommedaris, Enkhuizen

Estimate:

100,000 - 150,000 GBP

From an Important Private Collection

Cornelis Springer

Cornelis Springer

The Zuiderspui with the Drommedaris, Enkhuizen

The Zuiderspui with the Drommedaris, Enkhuizen

Estimate:

100,000 - 150,000 GBP

Lot sold:

239,400

GBP

From an Important Private Collection

Cornelis Springer

Dutch

1817 - 1891

The Zuiderspui with the Drommedaris, Enkhuizen


signed and dated C. Springer 1866 lower right; signed with monogram and dated 66 on the sledge; with the artist's seal and authenticated by the artist on a label on the reverse De ondergeteekende verklaart dat dit schilderij voorstellende Gezischt op het Spuij en Oosterpoort te Enkhuijzen Prov: Noord Holland door hem is vervaardigd. Amsterdam, 6 Junij 1866, C. Springer

oil on panel

Unframed: 49 by 65cm., 19¼ by 25½in.

Framed: 81 by 97cm., 32 by 38¼in.

C.J. Nieuwenhuijs, London (acquired from the artist on 18 June 1866)
Kunsthandel M. Wolff, Amsterdam
Sale: Mak van Waay, Amsterdam, 19 May 1965, lot 497
Private collection, The Netherlands
Sale: Sotheby's, Amsterdam, 23 April 2001, lot 229
Purchased at the above sale by the present owner
G.R. Kruissink, 'Cornelis Springer's werkwijze getoetst aan een Enkhuizer stadsgezicht', in Antiek, October 1971, p. 166, no. 3, illustrated
W. Laanstra, H.C. de Bruijn, Dr. J.H.A. Ringeling, Cornelis Springer (1817-1891), Utrecht, 1984, no. 66-6, catalogued & illustrated
Enkhuizen, Zuiderzeemuseum, Romantiek der Zuiderzeesteden, 1971, no. 2

Painted in the spring of 1866, at the height of Springer's artistic career, this view is based on sketches he made during trips to Enkhuizen in 1864 and 1865. As a rule, the artist would draw detailed preparatory sketches matching the actual size of his painting. In his delicate and precise manner, he would turn his sketches into a finished painting in his Amsterdam studio, which usually took about twenty days.


This part of the town has remained largely unchanged since Springer painted it. His meticulous observation of the built up environment can be seen through his accurate depiction of the facades of the sixteenth and seventeenth century buildings. Several genre-like scenes enliven the painting: a horse pulls a sledge over the cobbled stones towards the harbour whilst two men appear in animated conversation on the edge of the bridge. A lone man with a frock coat and top hat stands in the middle of the bridge looking toward the viewer, perhaps an allude to Springer himself preparing for his work in the golden afternoon sunlight. 


From the early 1860s onwards, the town of Enkhuizen became an important source of inspiration for Springer. Besides Amsterdam, his place of birth, no other Dutch town features as prominently in his oeuvre. The Drommedaris is the southern gateway of Enkhuizen, and the most famous building in the town. It was built as a defence tower for the old harbour of the town in the sixteenth century. Today, it houses a 44 bell carillon where by tradition the city carillonneur of Enkhuizen rings the bell every Thursday at noon.


The masterful depiction of architecture, the lively staffage and well balanced play of light indicate that this picture belongs to the masterpieces in the oeuvre of Springer.