MARRAPINTI, 2002
Property from a private collection, Maine
Naata Nungurrayi

MARRAPINTI, 2002

Lot Closed

MARRAPINTI, 2002
MARRAPINTI, 2002
MARRAPINTI, 2002
MARRAPINTI, 2002
MARRAPINTI, 2002
33

Naata Nungurrayi

MARRAPINTI, 2002

Estimate:

80,000 - 120,000 USD

Property from a private collection, Maine

Naata Nungurrayi

Naata Nungurrayi

MARRAPINTI, 2002

MARRAPINTI, 2002

Estimate:

80,000 - 120,000 USD

Description

Property from a private collection, Maine

Naata Nungurrayi

born circa 1932

MARRAPINTI, 2002


Synthetic polymer paint on linen

Bears artist's name, size and Papunya Tula Artists catalogue number MN0203141 on the reverse

72 in by 48 in (183 cm by 122 cm)

Condition report

To request a condition report for this lot, please email Gaia.Lettere@Sothebys.com.

Provenance

Painted at Kintore for Papunya Tula Artists in 2002, Alice Springs, Northern Territory
Private collection, Victoria
Sotheby's, Aboriginal Art, Melbourne, 31 July 2006, lot 126
Private collection, USA, acquired from the above auction

Catalogue note

Considered one of the most important artists to emerge from the group of women at Kintore and Kiwirrkurra who began painting for Papunya Tula Artists in 1996, Naata Nungurrayi’s artworks have continually held the attention of curators and major collectors. Her powerful and distinct paintings have been included in many of the most significant museum exhibitions, including Papunya Tula: Genesis and Genius at the Art Gallery of New South Wales in 2000. Major paintings have been acquired by the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, and other leading institutions. Consigned from an American collection, Marrapinti is one of the artist’s most significant and breathtaking paintings to come to auction in recent years.


This painting is sold with an accompanying Papunya Tula Artists certificate that reads:

'This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole and soakage water site of Marrapinti, to the west of the Pollock Hills in Western Australia. The lines are sandhills surrounding the area. A large group of senior women camped at this rockhole making the nose-bones which are worn through a hole in the nose web. These nose-bones were originally worn by both men and women but are now only worn by the older generation on ceremonial occasions. The women later travelled east passing through Wala Wala, Kiwirrkura and Ngaminya'


Cf. For a related painting of the same site see 'Untitled', 1999, in Perkins, H. and H. Fink (eds), Papunya Tula: Genesis and Genius, Art Gallery of New South Wales in association with Papunya Tula Artists, Sydney, 2000, p.145, illus.