Highlights From the Collection of Joseph and Brenda Calihan

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Launch Slideshow

Leading this year's annual Irish Art sale are sixteen works from the collection of Joseph and Brenda Calihan. The lots, which date from the mid-19th century to the mid-20th century, include the sumptuous Sunday Evening in September by Jack B.Yeats. All lots presented in this sale will be exhibited at the Royal Hibernian Academy in Dublin before the auction in London.

Irish Art
11 September 2018 |  London

Highlights From the Collection of Joseph and Brenda Calihan

  • Jack B. Yeats, Sunday Evening in September, 1949.
    Estimate £300,000-500,000
    For Yeats, who ‘loved this hour of the sun’s retiring’, St Stephen’s Green was a particular haven of romance and the subject informed several of his works. A young couple take an evening stroll, the iridescent girl accompanied by a man proudly clasping his jacket. Around them, other characters who have congregated on the Green emerge from the richly impastoed surface. The painting is an evocative ode to the city, of carefree evenings and a timeless tour de force.

    Irish Art
    11 September 2018 |  London
  • John Luke, Pax, 1943.
    Estimate £80,000-120,000
    Pax is the first of 12 small, jewel-like oil and tempera paintings John Luke made at Knappagh Farm, Co Armagh, which form the most significant period of his career. The art critic and later director of the National Gallery of Ireland claimed they had the ‘innocence of a visionary’ and directly compared the artist to the painters of the Italian Renaissance. It is an arrestingly beautiful and original work.

    Irish Art
    11 September 2018 |  London
  • Gerard Dillon, The Lobster Pots, Roundstone.
    Estimate £60,000-80,000
    This oil encapsulates the best of Dillon’s much-loved paintings of the west of Ireland, imbued with characteristic naivety, charm and innocence. It was painted the year Dillon invited fellow artists George Campbell and James MacIntyre to stay with him on Inishlacken, an island off Roundstone, where he had been given the use of a cottage for twelve months as part payment for a painting.

    Irish Art
    11 September 2018 |  London
  • Richard Thomas Moynan, Ball in the Cap, 1893.
    Estimate £100,000-150,000
    Moynan belonged to a group of Irish artists including Walter Osborne and Frank O’Meara who travelled to France and embraced the new naturalist style of plein air painting, evident in the present painting. On returning to Ireland, Moynan turned his attention to rural village life, and made a series of paintings in the early 1890s of mischievous, barefoot children at play which proved especially popular. Ball in the Cap not only offers a nostalgic look at youth and of time past, but makes a poignant comment on the hardships of indigent children in rural Ireland in the late 19th century.

    Irish Art
    11 September 2018 |  London
  • Beatrice Campbell, Lady Glenavy, The Intruder, 1931.
    Estimate £40,000-60,000
    This is one of the artist’s most significant and ambitious works which exemplifies the unique painterly style of Lady Glenavy. It was the centre-piece of her first solo exhibition in Dublin in 1935 and was enthusiastically received by the critics and was more recently on loan at the National Gallery of Ireland. Blending realism and romanticism, humour and originality, it is a mysterious vision of an otherworldly landscape undeniably entrancing.

    Irish Art
    11 September 2018 |  London
  • Jack B. Yeats, The Circus, 1921.
    Estimate £200,000-300,000
    Yeats loved unique characters, bawdy crowds and entertainment and the circuses that toured the west of Ireland captivated him as a young boy. Dramatically rendered, danger and drama abound in the present work. For Yeats, the circus acted as a metaphor for life, with its twin threads of comedy and tragedy, escape and travail.

    Irish Art
    11 September 2018 |  London
  • Daniel Maclise, The Ballad Seller, 1858.
    Estimate £30,000-50,000
    Maclise was Ireland's greatest historical painter and one of the most renowned painters of Victorian London. Having moved to the city in 1827, he secured his reputation with his commissions for the new Palace of Westminster. In The Ballad Seller, Maclise shows his ability to work as effectively on a smaller scale. Rendered in bright colours, a young lady selling ballads engages us directly as she crosses a garden gate upon which a robin sits – playing further upon the musical theme.

    Irish Art
    11 September 2018 |  London
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