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PROPERTY OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SECOND BARON HESKETH'S WILL TRUST

A Regency mahogany twin-pedestal desk, early 19th century, in the manner of Thomas Hope
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68

PROPERTY OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE SECOND BARON HESKETH'S WILL TRUST

A Regency mahogany twin-pedestal desk, early 19th century, in the manner of Thomas Hope
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Style: Private Collections

|
London

A Regency mahogany twin-pedestal desk, early 19th century, in the manner of Thomas Hope
with horizontal bands of ebonised embossed floral mouldings, the leather-lined top above a drawer enclosing a leather-lined writing slope/slide concealing quadrant swinging compartments within pylon shaped pedestals with ebonised palmette carved antefixae fitted with cupboards and opposing sides with five small drawers enclosed by doors, the lower sections with opposed sets of three ebony strung drawers on a moulded incurved plinth
152cm. high, 187cm. wide, 91cm. deep; 4ft. 11¾in., 6ft. 1½in., 3ft.
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Provenance

With H. Blairman & Sons Ltd;
Possibly acquired by Sir Thomas Fermor-Hesketh, 8th Bt., later 1st Lord Hesketh (1881-1944) or Frederick Fermor-Hesketh, 2nd Baron Hesketh DL (1916-1955);
thence by descent.

Literature

M. Jourdain and F. Rose, English Furniture: The Georgian Period 1750-1830, London, 1953, figs. 20 (detail) and 105;
C. Musgrave, Regency Furniture: 1800 to 1830, London, 1961, pl. 19.

RELATED LITERATURE:

T. Hope, Household Furniture and Interior Decoration, 1807, pl. XI, fig. 1

Catalogue Note

This exceptional mahogany pedestal desk betrays the influence Thomas Hope (d. 1831), the celebrated arbiter of early Regency taste. The form relates to a ‘large library or writing-table’ in Hope’s seminal publication Household Furniture and Interior Decoration, 1807, pl. XI, fig. 1, in which he explains that the distinctive antefixae adorned pediments recall the ‘shape of ancient Greek house roofs’.

Hope was of wealthy Amsterdam banking stock and was a great collector and patron. He became a great promoter of the 'Goût Grec' 'following his grand tour of 1787-1795 which imbued him with the 'Spirit of Corinth and Athens'. His house in Duchess Street open to serious art collectors was witness to this passion and was much admired and had a profound influence on taste in 19th century.

Style: Private Collections

|
London