Lot 111
  • 111

A Victorian enameled silver-gilt and cut-glass toilet set in a brass-mounted rosewood case, Thomas Johnson I, London, 1861

Estimate
6,000 - 8,000 USD
bidding is closed

Description

  • all but smallest pieces¬†marked, the case with retailer plaque "W. Leuchars 38 Piccadilly London"
  • silver, enamel, glass, wood, brass
  • length of case 15 3/4 in.
  • 40 cm
comprising six silver-capped cut-glass boxes in sizes, four silver-capped cut-glass bottles in sizes, a silver-capped cut-glass jar, three cut-glass dishes in sizes, a large and a small hand mirror, a shoe horn, thimble, nail file, corkscrew, pocket knife, double-ended spoon, pen, propelling pencil with seal top, two pairs of scissors, and nine other sewing implements, 35 pieces total, the silver applied with gold disks monogrammed SLZ and the larger peices decorated with light blue champlev√© enamel arabesques, all in a brass-mounted rosewood case with key. Together with a non-matching hand mirror.

Condition

several gaps in the lower drawer: lacking 3 tools and 2 tools do not appear to fit properly in their slots, 3 glass bottles and 1 glass box with minor chips to glass, the wood case with some cracks to the veneer, each side of the case with a pop-out drawer- one opens and is velvet lined- the other drawer was unable to be opened, otherwise good
In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.
NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Catalogue Note

Leuchars & Son, known as dressing-case makers, stationers and retail silversmiths, began in 1794 with Joseph Leuchars and was continued by his widow, Lucy, and their son, William. The firm was represented at a number of exhibitions, including the Great Exhibition of 1851, the International Exhibition of 1862 and the Paris Exhibition of 1878. A dressing set by Leuchars containing silver-mounted glass bottles also by Thomas Johnson from 1866 are listed among the wares they produced in John Culme, Directory of Gold and Silversmiths, 1987, p. 291. The firm was acquired by Asprey & Son in 1888.