Three Private Collections, Five Stunning Pieces

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Fine selections from three private collections feature in the sale of furniture, sculptures and objets d’art in Paris on 27 April. These include pieces from a French aristocratic collection, works from a fine Paris Rive Gauche apartment including Spitzer and Rothschild provenances, and a further collection focusing on the Empire style. The catalogue highlights several leading names in the 18th century decorative arts, ranging from the rarest to the most famous: Pierre Gouthière, Jean Desforges, Mathieu Beauve Georges Jacob and Nicolas Heurtaut. Click ahead to see five of the highlights.

Important Mobilier, Sculptures et Objets d'Art
27 April 2017 | Paris

Three Private Collections, Five Stunning Pieces

  • A Chinese lacquer and European lacquer commode, Louis XV, circa 1740-1750, stamped D.F. for Jean Desforges.
    Estimate €150,000–200,000.
    Parisian master cabinet-maker Jean Desforges specialised in furniture (almost solely commodes) with Chinese or Japanese lacquer ornamentation. This unusual model features Chinese lacquer panels dating from 1700-1715, inspired by the Edo period Japanese lacquers, with gold motifs. The piece has several features typical of Desforges' furniture, starting with the façade, decorated with three lacquer panels taken from the same Chinese screen, emphasised with gilt bronze. The cabinet-maker very probably made the commode for a leading Paris entrepreneur.

  • A gilt-bronze, painted-tole and porcelain flowers lantern in Louis XV style, 19th century.
    Estimate €30,000–50,000.
    The marchand mercier Lazare Duvaux made a speciality of lanterns ornamented with porcelain flowers, which he sold to the court and the most important farmers-general. His order book mentions a large number these items, like this 19th century Louis XV-style lantern in gilt bronze with porcelain flowers (estimate: €30,000-50,000).

  • A large carved gilt and painted armchair, Louis XV, circa 1760, attributed to Mathieu de Bauve.
    Estimate €60,000–100,000.
    A highly sought-after cabinet-maker with a small output, Mathieu Beauve produced imposing Louis XV seating whose impeccable execution glorified the beauty of the lines. He developed a very particular style. This Louis XV flat-backed armchair in carved painted gilt wood from around 1760 is an original model heralding the neo-classic style.

  • A pair of white marble, patinated and gilt-bronze ewers, Louis XVI, circa 1780, attributed to Pierre Gouthière.
    Estimate €50,000–70,000.
    A gilder and chaser to Louis XV and Louis XVI, Pierre Gouthière was one of the most celebrated craftsmen of the 18th century. Thanks to the protection of the Duc d’Aumont, he worked for the Menus-Plaisirs du Roi (the Department in charge of events and festivities), particularly in 1770, with the famous jewel box presented to the Dauphine for her marriage. This pair of Louis XVI ornamental ewers in white marble and patinated gilt bronze are attributed to him. The remarkably precise chasing meticulously renders natural motifs like the ivy leaves, the face of the small faun and the plaited cords.

  • A carved giltwood sofa, Louis XV, stamped N. Heurtaut.
    Estimate €15,000–25,000.
    A cabinet-maker considered one of the greatest masters of seat-making, Nicolas Heurtaut first produced pieces with a predominantly Rococo feel before developing a more restrained style. The sale includes this small Louis XV three-backed sofa in carved gilt wood, stamped N. Heurtaut. It has a floral pattern decoration, and stands on six elegantly curved feet.

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