Stunning 18th Century French Furniture & Russian and European Silver Lead Style Sale in Paris

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This spring, Sotheby's 'Style' auction, in Paris on 9 April, will showcase furniture, sculpture and works of art from a variety of artistic movements that have shaped decorative arts, from the Renaissance to the 18th century. Click above to see our specialist highlights of XIXe furniture and silver lots.

Stunning 18th Century French Furniture & Russian and European Silver Lead Style Sale in Paris

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    A very important pair of gilt-bronze mounted ebony, Boulle tortoiseshell and brass "en première partie et contre-partie" marquetry bookcases, Louis XIV, circa 1710-1720, stamped Nicolas Sageot and NS.
    Estimate €150,000–250,000

    Sageot’s success was undeniable throughout the years beginning at the end of the Louix XIV period to the Régence and finally to the early Louis XV period, with clients including European royalty.
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    A pair of Louis XIV gilt-bronze mounted Boulle tortoiseshell, brass, mother-of-pearl and tin marquetry commodes, "en première partie et contre-partie" attributed to Nicolas Sageot, circa 1700.
    Estimate €150,000–250,000

    This pair of commodes, remarkable in their quality and the abundance of their marquetry decoration show similarities with other commodes originating from the production of Nicolas Sageot (1666-1701). His production includes primarily armoires, commodes and bureaux, all decorated with tortoiseshell and brass marquetry in the style of André-Charles Boulle (1642-1732) of whom he became the foremost competitor.
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    An important silver-gilt tea and coffee set, Jean-Baptiste-Claude Odiot, Paris, 1809-1819
    Estimate €25,000-35,000

    Son of the Russian Empress Kathrin II and Tsar Alexander’s I brother, Grand-Duke Mikhail Pavlovitch ordered this important silver-gilt tea and coffee set by the most celebrated Parisian silversmith Jean-Baptiste-Claude Odiot.
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    A French Régence brass inlaid ebonised and varnished bronze bureau plat, attributed to François Lieutaud, circa 1720
    Estimate €100,000–150,000

    Our bureau plat is almost identical to those stamped FL by François Lieutaud at the Ansbach Residenz and those without any stamp actually kept in the King's bedroom at the Bamberg Residenz. The gilt-bronze mounts are similar, especially the handles that we also found on several pieces stamped Lieutaud.
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    An Empire suite of four gilt-bronze candelabra, circa 1810
    Estimate €60,000-100,000

    This suite of four candelabra reprises the drawing realised by Charles Percier in 1802 for the boudoir of Joséphine Bonaparte in Saint-Cloud. This kind of Renommée model, standing on one foot on a sphere was used by many bronziers at the beginning of 19th century. We find this model with variants in the current residence of the ambassador of England in Paris and in several public collections. An identical model is kept at the Villa Borghese in Rome.
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    A Louis XV gilt-bronze mounted, ebony and copper marquetry bureau plat, circa 1760, after a model by André-Charles Boulle
    Estimate €80,000–120,000

    This bureau plat is directly inspired by a desk created by André-Charles Boulle during the early 18th century.

    An examination of the woods used and the construction suggests a production from the same Parisian workshop, being distant from that of André-Charles Boulle. It was probably a workshop active in the mid-18th century specializing in Boulle marquetry (restoration and fabrication), which produced furniture "in the Boulle genre" by reusing ornaments and bronzes created by.
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    A three leaf gilt-bronze kingwood veneer folding screen, by François Linke, circa 1903-1909, index number 705
    Estimate €60,000-100,000
    From Linke's personal collection.

    Although the outline and detail in this screen is clearly looking back to the traditional themes of rocaille, this style has become eternally linked with that of the reign of Louis XV. However there is clear evidence of the hand of Léon Messagé in the pieces exhibited and also in the present lot, coming as it does directly from the Linke family on the female line, having never been restored.
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    A French gilt-bronze mounted kingwood, satiné, holly and hornbeam marquetry "Coquille" table by François Linke, index number 544, circa 1900
    Estimate €60,000-100,000
    From Linke's personal collection.

    Combining traditional Louis XV values with the modern idiom of the Art Nouveau, this table of unusual and innovative design, is a seminal item of Belle Époque furniture, the apogee of Linke’s collaboration with his sculptor Léon Messagé. The table was an important part of Linke’s oeuvre for his stand at the 1900 Exposition Universelle, where he was awarded the Gold Medal.
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    A Louis XIV Savonnerie moquette four-leaf folding screen, Chaillot manufacture, circa 1707-1709
    Estimate €50,000–80,000

    This rose à la mosaïque model was the first pattern woven at the Savonnerie from 1707 and was probably designed by Blain de Fontenay.
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    A gold oval presentation dish with the monogram of Catherine II, Moscow, circa 1760
    Estimate €40,000-60,000


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    A gold and blue enamel presentation box insert with a miniature representing Napoléon Bonaparte by Isabey, Adrien Vachette, Paris, 1798-1809
    Estimate €20,000-30,000

    This presentation box gathered two of the most acclaimed artists of Empire period, the painter Isabey and the box-maker Adrien Vachette. Together, they combined their talents to create this magnificent box devoted to First Consul Napoléon Bonaparte.
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    A large silver boat, Tiffany & Co. New York, modern, with import marks for London
    Estimate €18,000–22,000

    The wind blows strongly in this two-master sailing-boat made by Tiffany, one of the most famous American silversmiths.
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    A 17th century Parisian workshop tapestry depicting the story of Rinaldo and Armida, by Simon Vouet, circa 1640
    Estimate €60,000-80,000

    It is traditionally accepted that the series of paintings, depicting the Rinaldo and Armida cycle by Simon Vouet, was executed for Henri de Fourcy, superintendent of the King’s Buildings, for the Chessy Château’s gallery (destroyed after the French Revolution).

    This cycle, woven three times for the Crown and several times for private patrons, became part of the Barberini collections quite early. Nowadays, it is the most complete cycle and was transferred to the Flint Institute of Arts.
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    A pair of two-light silver-gilt candelabra, Ennemond Ruynat, Grenoble, 1745-1749
    Estimate €15,000-20,000

    A very sophisticated pair of silver-gilt two-light candelabra in the Parisian style but with Grenoble hallmarks.

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