View full screen - View 1 of Lot 498. Extremely Rare and Fine Carved and Figured Maple, Engraved Brass and Steel Flintlock American Long Rifle, John George Rupp (1721-1807), Macungie Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, Circa 1775.
498

Extremely Rare and Fine Carved and Figured Maple, Engraved Brass and Steel Flintlock American Long Rifle, John George Rupp (1721-1807), Macungie Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, Circa 1775

Estimate:

30,000 - 50,000 USD

Extremely Rare and Fine Carved and Figured Maple, Engraved Brass and Steel Flintlock American Long Rifle, John George Rupp (1721-1807), Macungie Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, Circa 1775

Extremely Rare and Fine Carved and Figured Maple, Engraved Brass and Steel Flintlock American Long Rifle, John George Rupp (1721-1807), Macungie Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, Circa 1775

Estimate:

30,000 - 50,000 USD

Lot sold:

60,480

USD

Extremely Rare and Fine Carved and Figured Maple, Engraved Brass and Steel Flintlock American Long Rifle

John George Rupp (1721-1807)

Macungie Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

Circa 1775


The octagonal barrel engraved John Rupp with a .60 caliber smoothbore. Triangular patch in between the rear barrel tang and bold side plate.

Length 58 3/8 in.; Barrel Length 42 in.

In overall fine condition with a beautiful dark, rich, dry surface. The heavily swamped octagonal barrel engraved "John Rupp", with .60 caliber smoothbore. Length from muzzle to tang 42 3/4 in. The stock contains incised carvings with the Lehigh Valley Indian head forward of the trigger guard. The butt is 4 3/4 inches high by 2 inches wide with a large flat cheek piece that protrudes protrudes almost 2 inches from the stock. There is an old break out near the frizzen spring and light rust in the pan. The lock is reconverted and there are multiple patched repairs to the forestock. There is a patch and slight shrinkage to the area above the side plate, to the rear of the barrel tang. Appears to retain its original faceted ramrods.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Joseph Kindig, Jr., York, Pennsylvania;
Keith and Ruth Collis, Lancaster, Pennsylvania;
Nancy Rohrbach, Lehigh, Pennsylvania;
Acquired through the assistance of John Kolar, Lebanon, Pennsylvania.
Joseph Kindig, Jr., Thoughts on the Kentucky Rifle in Its Golden Age, York, Pennsylvania, George Shumway, 196), no. 62, p. 176;
John Kolar, "The Gunsmith John Rupp," Muzzle Blasts Magazine, July 2017, pp. 22-25.

There are few records that detail the elder John George Rupp’s (1721-1807) trade as a gunsmith, and the genealogical records of the Rupp family in relation to their gun manufacturing activity further complicates the identification of Rupp rifles, making them of utmost rarity. This is the earliest signed John Rupp rifle known and generally considered the earliest signed rifle made in the Lehigh Valley. This beautifully aged rifle exhibits early, Pre-Revolutionary war attributes as well as those indicative of Lehigh Valley. The gun possesses overall heavier architecture compared to the later rifles as well as a wonderful early roman-nose profile. The decoration is elegantly understated, featuring a dark, dry surface over a subtle curly maple stock with delicately incised carving that includes early foliate C-scrolls on the buttstock, forward the cheekpiece and patchbox, and lower butt molding. The Lehigh Valley ‘Indian head,’ is a feature solely used by this region that is incised with charming naiveite forward of the trigger guard. Foliate designs curling around the base of the ramrod pipe extend in straight lines along either side of the forestock terminating at the muzzle cap. The architecture of the rifle counters its delicate ornament, featuring a more abrupt flat butt plate, thick stock, protruding cheek piece, and broad wrist. The octagonal barrel tapers towards the middle but then flares at the muzzle. The faceted ramrod is yet another early component, which is most definitely period and possibly original. To directly quote Kindig on this Pennsylvania long rifle, “this is a rather choice rifle by a maker whose work is rare.”


Please note that Historic Rock Ford of Lancaster, Pennsylvania has extended the invitation to include this rifle in their upcoming exhibition Long Rifles of the American Revolution: How Lancaster Craftsmen Helped Win, June 1, 2022-October 30, 2022. A comprehensive packet regarding loan information has been prepared for the purchaser of this rifle to explore this opportunity. For further information on Historic Rock Ford, see https://historicrockford.org/long-rifles-of-the-american-revolution/.