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Rudolf Ernst

The Guard

Property from a Distinguished American Collection (Lots 1-21)

Rudolf Ernst

Rudolf Ernst

The Guard

The Guard

Property from a Distinguished American Collection (Lots 1-21)

Rudolf Ernst

Austrian

1854 - 1932

The Guard


signed R. Ernst. lower left

oil on panel

Unframed: 33 by 23.7cm., 13 by 9¼in.

Framed: 54 by 44.5cm., 21¼ by 17½in.

The panel is straight and providing a strong support to the paint surface. The work is in good condition, ready to hang. Examination under ultra-violet light reveals no evidence of retouching or restoration.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Sale: Christie's, London, 17 June 1999, lot 52
In the present work the figure, dressed magnificently in shining silk and rich velvet, is holding a type of Ottoman sword called a yataghan.

Born in Vienna in 1854, Rudolf Ernst received his early training under Anselm Feuerbach at the Vienna Academy, of which his painter-architect father, Leopold Ernst, was also a member. Ernst travelled to Rome and, in the 1880s, to Spain, Morocco, and Tunisia. Later travels would take him to Egypt and, in 1890, to Turkey. In 1876, Ernst settled in France, exhibiting regularly at the Salon de la Société des artistes français and eventually taking French nationality. After starting out painting portraits and genre scenes, from 1885 Ernst turned exclusively to painting Orientalist subjects, which he worked up from the sketches, photographs, souvenirs, and memories accumulated during his travels. A large number of works were executed in his studio in Paris at 25 rue Humboldtwhich he decorated in an eclectic Eastern style, and in which he would paint wearing a taboosh, the better to transport himself mentally into the world created in his canvases. He would remain there until he moved to Fontenay-aux-Roses early in the twentieth century.