View full screen - View 1 of Lot 101. Attributed to William Aikman, Portrait of a gentleman, traditionally identified as Viscount Falkland | Attribué à William Aikman, Portrait d'un gentilhomme dit du Vicomte Falkland.
101

Attributed to William Aikman, Portrait of a gentleman, traditionally identified as Viscount Falkland | Attribué à William Aikman, Portrait d'un gentilhomme dit du Vicomte Falkland

VAT applies to hammer price and buyer's premium

Estimate:

12,000 - 18,000 EUR

The Property from an important Private European Collector | Provenant d'une importante collection particulière européenne

Attributed to William Aikman, Portrait of a gentleman, traditionally identified as Viscount Falkland | Attribué à William Aikman, Portrait d'un gentilhomme dit du Vicomte Falkland

Attributed to William Aikman, Portrait of a gentleman, traditionally identified as Viscount Falkland | Attribué à William Aikman, Portrait d'un gentilhomme dit du Vicomte Falkland

Estimate:

12,000 - 18,000 EUR

Attributed to William Aikman

Cairnie 1682 - 1731 London

Portrait of a gentleman, traditionally identified as Viscount Falkland


Oil on canvas, unframed

127,3 x 101,6 cm ; 50⅛ by 40 in.

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Attribué à William Aikman

Cairnie 1682 - 1731 Londres

Portrait d'un gentilhomme dit du Vicomte Falkland


Huile sur toile, sans cadre

127,3 x 101,6 cm ; 50⅛ by 40 in.

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Please note: Condition XVI of the Conditions of Business for Buyers (Online Only) is not applicable to this lot. (Veuillez noter que l'Article XVI des Conditions Générales de Vente applicables aux Vendeurs (Ventes Effectuées Exclusivement en Ligne) n'est pas applicable pour ce lot.)


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Mount Congreve: The London Sale, London, Christie's, 23 May 2012, lot 3.  

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Mount Congreve: The London Sale, Londres, Christie's, 23 mai 2012, lot 3. 

Scottish by birth, William Aikman was at university when he met the painter Allan Ramsay (1713-1784), a painting by whom is also being offered in the current sale (lot 102). In 1707, Aikman left for Rome, to study the works of antiquity. In order to be able to devote himself to painting, he decided to sell the properties he had just inherited and travelled to Constantinople (now Istanbul). He returned to Edinburgh in 1712, where his portraits met with success. In 1723, John Campbell, Duke of Argyll and Greenwich (1680-1743) provided Aikman with the financial support that enabled him to settle in London with his family.


Here he met Sir Godfrey Kneller (1646-1723), with whose works his own are sometimes confused, and received commissions for portraits from London aristocrats. Members of the nobility who commissioned him included the Earl of Burlington, who asked him to paint a portrait of the royal family.


The present portrait, with its serene simplicity, is close to the works that made William Aikman’s name. The costume is rendered accurately, in simple colours and without superfluous effects. The base of ruined columns, on the left of the composition, as well as the rounded arch behind the figure, could be a memory of his time in Italy. In the background, cavalrymen in front of an encampment suggest that the subject had a military connection, although he cannot be precisely identified. 

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D’origine écossaise, William Aikman rencontre à l’université le peintre Allan Ramsay (1713-1784), dont nous présentons également une toile dans cette vente (lot 102). Dès 1707 il part à Rome, pour y découvrir les œuvres de l’Antiquité. Pour pouvoir se consacrer à la peinture, Aikman choisit de vendre les propriétés dont il vient d’hériter, et se rend à Constantinople, l’actuelle Istanbul. Il rentre à Edinbourg en 1712, où il trouve le succès grâce à ses portraits. John Campbell, Duc d’Argyll et de Greenwich (1680-1743) fournit alors le soutien financier nécessaire à Aikman pour qu’il s’installe à Londres en 1723, avec sa famille.


Il y rencontre notamment Sir Godfrey Kneller (1646-1723), avec qui ses œuvres sont parfois confondues, et reçoit des commandes de portraits de la part de l’aristocratie londonienne. Parmi ses nobles commanditaires, le Comte de Burlington le sollicite pour exécuter un portrait de la famille royale.


Le présent portrait, de par sa simplicité et sa sérénité, se rapproche des œuvres de William Aikman qui firent sa renommée. Les costumes sont représentés avec justesse, dans des coloris simples et sans effets superflus. La base de colonnes en ruines, à gauche de la composition, ainsi que l’arche arrondie derrière le personnage pourraient être un souvenir de son séjour italien. Au fond, des cavaliers devant un campement désignent le portraituré comme un militaire, sans qu’il soit possible de préciser davantage son identité.