View full screen - View 1 of Lot 92. Courtyard of the Doge's Palace, Venice.
92

Rudolph von Alt

Courtyard of the Doge's Palace, Venice

Property from the Descendants of David Goldmann

Rudolph von Alt

Rudolph von Alt

Courtyard of the Doge's Palace, Venice

Courtyard of the Doge's Palace, Venice

Property from the Descendants of David Goldmann

Rudolph von Alt

Vienna 1812 - 1905

Courtyard of the Doge's Palace, Venice


signed, lower left: R Alt

watercolor 

sight size: 20 ¾ by 15 ¼ in.; 52.7 by 38.8 cm.

framed: 37 by 31 ¼ in.; 93.9 by 79.3 cm.

The four extremities of the sheet are fully adhered to a modern mount. The current mount covers an approximate two-inch border of the sheet, however, the entire composition appears to be visible. There is some slight discoloration in the clouds of the sky. The watercolor remains predominantly fresh throughout with the overall image strong. Sold in a decorative giltwood frame.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

David Goldmann (1887-1967), Vienna;
Seized from the above by Hitler's agents and allocated in the central depot of the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna (inv. D.G. 7), where it was reserved for the Fuhrermuseum;
Transferred to Alt Ausse (inv. no. 2227) from where recovered by Monuments Officers September 1947 and restituted to David Goldmann 15 May 1948, New York;
Thence by descent to the present owner.

A note about the provenance:

Lots 10, 87, 91 and 92 come from the noteworthy collection of David Goldmann, an Austrian businessman who fled his home country with his family in 1938 after the annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany. Goldmann amassed a significant fine and decorative arts collection consisting of Italian, Northern and Austrian paintings as well as Viennese porcelain and furniture. Soon after the Anschluss, the Gestapo deemed Goldmann’s apartment and contents as “enemy property”.1 The most valuable items of the group were removed and reserved for Hitler’s Führermuseum while the rest were auctioned off by the Dorotheum. 


The reverse of the paintings memorializes this complicated period of their history with labels noting each depot and storage facility the paintings moved to while under German control. After being taken to the central depot of the Kunsthistoriches Museum, the paintings were then stored in the Altaussee salt mine, which was then seized by the U.S. Army on May 8, 1945, and the artworks transferred to the Munich Central Collecting Point marking the beginnings of the restitution process. Goldmann managed to successfully have most of these items returned to him in New York by the late 1940s. The paintings and drawings have remained in the family since this time.


1. A. Reininghaus, Recollecting. Raub und Restitution, exhibition catalogue, Vienna 2009, p. 133.