Say it Loud: The Best Moments from The Chatsworth Festival

art-out-loud-recirc.jpg
Launch Slideshow

This year's installment of The Chatsworth Festival – Art Out Loud saw stars of the art world join forces with writers, designers and broadcasters in the beautiful grounds of Chatsworth House in Derbyshire. The Duke and Duchess of Devonshire welcomed hundreds of art enthusiasts over the weekend, who were taken on a musical journey by Lizzie Ball, educated on matters of taste by Grayson Perry, and invited on a tour of fashion through the ages by Jonquil O'Reilly and Lady Laura Burlington

Photographed by Richard Kelly

Read our interviews with speakers from Art Out Loud

American Sculpture. Beyond Limits

Chatsworth House | 15 September — 12 November 2017

Say it Loud: The Best Moments from The Chatsworth Festival

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Lady Laura Burlington kicks off the festival interviewing fashion designer Jasper Conran.
    "You always have to challenge yourself, or you simply won't survive. After the setbacks I had after the crash in America, I had a fire in my belly and thought: "I can do anything"."



     



    Jasper Conran 

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Alastair Sooke in conversation with Phyllida Barlow in the Theatre at Chatsworth.
    "On my second day at the Slade, Reg Butler came to me and said: "I won’t be talking to you. In ten years' time you'll be making jam and having babies" and I said “What’s wrong with that?” He didn’t have an answer. Being an artist and a mother is incredibly hard. I have always shown and made art. With recognition, or without."



     



    Phyllida Barlow

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Lady Laura Burlington discusses the origins of the House Style exhibition at Chatsworth.
    "This was a journey of discovery through the ages. It all began when looking for a christening gown for my son. Our head of textiles Susie Stokoe took us into a room piled high with boxes, and everything was there.



     



    Christian Dior only made clothing for his own label for ten years — and this dress is one of those items. It had no label and was hanging over the back of a chair in Deborah's attic. There is now way we ever would have found it if not for Hamish Bowles. He recognised it straight away and almost danced a little jig when he realised the significance of what it was. He had to rush out to find some wi-fi so he could show me what it was!"



     



    Lady Laura Burlington

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Lady Burlington welcoming Christopher Kane and Sarah Mower to the stage.
  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Fashion designer Christopher Kane on stage.
    "I've forever been in love with the working woman. From the cleaner to the business woman. The collection is about cleaning. A lot of the textiles are from me being in the pound shop, buying sponges, brillo pads and magic wands, which then become knit structures or a lurex sweater. I love nylon and I've always been fascinated with rubbish. I made sponge shoes last season which raised a lot of eyebrows and this time I made a mop head dress.



     



    I'm very happy with a stapler, I staple everything. It's super-fast, there's no time for pins.  I'm a bit like Edward Scissorhands cause I've got always got a stapler in each hand and I work quickly!"



     



    Christopher Kane

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Chistopher Kane and Sarah Mower meet guests after their talk.
    "I would draw relentlessly as a kid. People were worried that I was drawing too many naked people. So to harness that passion when I was sixteen I was thrown in to the Glasgow School of Art life drawing class, and that was a turning point for me.  Drawing helps you to see." 



     



    Christopher Kane

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Martin Gayford discussing his and David Hockney's book A History of Pictures.
    "David Hockney always says that Caravaggio invented Hollywood lighting, and I think he's right. And as Hitchcock famously said: "A face doesn't exist until it's lit". Shadows are an irresistable illusion."



     



    Martin Gayford

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Chatsworth Curator Kate Brindley introduces Yinka Shonibare and Alastair Sooke to the stage.
  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Alastair Sooke and Yinka Shonibare MBE in conversation.
    "I was expected to read law. I came from a very strict middle-class Nigerian family and when I told my father I wanted to be an artist he was shocked. My parents thought I would grow out of it."



     



    Yinka Shonibare MBE

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Broadcaster Alastair Sooke questions Yinka Shonibare MBE on his early influences.
    "As a student I was not very politicised, but gradually over time, I had to ask a series of questions about authenticity, so off I went to Brixton market to find African fabrics. Little did I know, what I found were Indonesian-inspired prints, produced by the Dutch and sold in West Africa! I decided to fragment white, male monumentality because I physically couldn't make works like that."



     



    Yinka Shonibare MBE

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Fashion designer Erdem Moralioglu discusses his work.
    "Working on the collaboration with H&M was fascinating because I was also making clothes for men, which is a new arena for me. A completely different approach — and so democratic. It has changed the way I design for women for sure. They were so open in the whole collaborative process which was really refreshing and encouraging right down to sourcing of the materials. I've always had an incremental approach to design, so who knows what is next. 



     



    There is a tremendous power to the nature of the feminine. It’s not a weakness or delicacy, it’s a powerful strength. I can take someone somewhere for the eight minutes of a show, and the possibilities are endless."



     



    Erdem Moralioglu

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Grayson Perry takes to stage on the South Lawn.
  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    V&A Director Tristram Hunt address the audience as Ann Treneman looks on.
    "The V&A is the platform for ingenuity and allowing the imagination to run wild. Our curators are as much interested in curating the future as they are presenting the past."



     



    Tristram Hunt



    Read our interview with Tristram Hunt 

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    The Duke of Devonshire and Sotheby's Simon Stock discussing the art collection at Chatsworth House.
  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Lorcan O'Neill and Richard Long in conversation.
    "Walking is the simplest way to be in the landscape. Walking is my medium. I've no interest in making monumental works. Many of my works end up being scattered by animals or overgrown with vegetation. People might see a lot of my works out in the world, they might just not recognise it as art!"



     



    Richard Long

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Lizzie Ball and Morgan Szymanski on the South Lawn after their performance.
    "The more research I did in to Frida Kahlo, the more I began to realise she is present in the lives of so many of us. Frida's image is as familiar as that of the iconic one of Che Guevara; you can find them on almost every street corner wall graffiti or in every gift store in Latin America."



     



    Lizzie Ball



    Read our interview with Lizzie Ball

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Lady Burlington signs a copy of House Style for a guest.
     



    Discover videos from Chatsworth and other leading cultural institutions on the Sotheby’s Museum Network .

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Jeff McMillan, Cornelia Parker and Alice Rawsthorn.
    "People do ask me about the place of violence in my work. As a child you go around bashing things and breaking things. You’re very curious and you don’t know what the objects are and whether they’re fragile or not. I started photographing spills and breakages; an oil stain in Bethlehem, spilt milk in Jerusalem or a cup of coffee in Brussels. These movements of peril and disaster are all around us, it’s part of our psyche.



    There is something very cathartic about steam-rolling a trophy when I never won any. It’s all very simple Freudian stuff!"



     



    Cornelia Parker

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Sotheby's Jonquil O'Reilly talks about extreme fashion through the ages.
    "The grand tour was often when many would start their art collections, and it was also an opportunity to have a portrait painted. Whilst you were waiting for your Canaletto to be finished you could have your likeness painted. The way they chose to be portrayed, and the reality were sometimes a little at odds with each  other."



     



    Jonquil O'Reilly

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Attendees waiting to have their House Style catalogues signed.
     



    Read James Reginato's article on House Style at Chatsworth for Sotheby's magazine .

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Emma Simpson and Joel Shapiro.
    "Joseph Beuys was important for everybody. He was the alternative to formal engagement, and an inventor of the cult of personality and idiosyncrasy. Some of the pieces I make are really quite scary because of the scale — I test things relentlessly."



     



    Joel Shapiro

  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    A guest asks a question during Richard Long's talk.
  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Lorcan O'Neill and Richard Long.
  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Tristram Hunt on the South Lawn.
  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Grayson Perry and festival director Sheron Reynolds.
  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    The Duke of Devonshire talks to a guest.
  • Photography: Richard Kelly/Sotheby's
    Richard Long signs a copy of his book for the Duchess of Devonshire.
  • Sotheby's Jonquil O'Reilly takes a question form the floor.
    "One of the ways we can reconstruct what people were wearing historically is letters. Most often, from women. Women were left at home whilst their husbands, sons and brothers went off to war or university. Men rarely kept letters, but the women left at home kept them — in a box, perfumed and treasured. It is these accounts that serve as our most authentic record."



     



    Jonquil O'Reilly

/
Close

We use our own and third party cookies to enable you to navigate around our Site, use its features and engage on social media, and to allow us to perform analytics, remember your preferences, provide services that you have requested and produce content and advertisements tailored to your interests, both on our Site as well as others. For more information, or to learn how to change your cookie or marketing preferences, please see our updated Privacy Policy & Cookie Policy.

By continuing to use our Site, you consent to our use of cookies and to the practices described in our updated Privacy Policy.

Close