View full screen - View 1 of Lot 44. Alalgura (Alhalkere) - My Country, 1991.
44

Emily Kame Kngwarreye

Alalgura (Alhalkere) - My Country, 1991

Emily Kame Kngwarreye

Emily Kame Kngwarreye

Alalgura (Alhalkere) - My Country, 1991

Alalgura (Alhalkere) - My Country, 1991

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Emily Kame Kngwarreye

Circa 1910 - 1996

Alalgura (Alhalkere) - My Country, 1991


Synthetic polymer paint on canvas

Bears artist’s name and Delmore Gallery catalogue number IU24 on the reverse

90 ½ in by 47 ¼ in (230 by 120 cm)

The painting is unframed and on a lightweight stretcher. The painting appears in excellent condition with no repairs or restorations. There are some very tiny scuffs to the lower corners. 


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Painted at Delmore Downs Station for the Delmore Gallery in April 1991
Uniquely Australian Gallery, Los Angeles
Private Collection

This painting is sold with a copy of its original Delmore Gallery documentation with notes by Janet Holt that read in part, "the central panel down this work reveals the underlying 'story' element. It also gives an interesting depth that highlights Emily's aerial perception of her country. In a layered view we can seek to understand what she is trying to teach us. Emily's 'story' is of her country called Alalgura. She has custodial responsibility for certain species. The one shown here is the important Anooralaya yam, whose interconnecting and underground roots can be observed.


Emily believes that ceremony helps 'grow up' the country and in particular those bush tucker species she 'looks after'. As well, she nurtures those women who are taking over her role. They will continue the spirit life of the bush in order to assure the continuance of the desert's life cycle.


The choice and shades of colour can show us the state of the country, with the mix of raw, ripe and dry food sources. Understanding this is intrinsic to survival in the desert."