View full screen - View 1 of Lot 85. A pair of Italian near-lifesize polychrome decorated figural standard bearers, Venice, 18th century.
85

A pair of Italian near-lifesize polychrome decorated figural standard bearers, Venice, 18th century

UK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

15,000 to - 25,000 GBP

Property from Charleton House, Fife

A pair of Italian near-lifesize polychrome decorated figural standard bearers, Venice, 18th century

A pair of Italian near-lifesize polychrome decorated figural standard bearers, Venice, 18th century

Estimate:

15,000 to - 25,000 GBP

Lot sold:

37,800

GBP

Property from Charleton House, Fife

A pair of Italian near-lifesize polychrome decorated figural standard bearers, Venice, 18th century


each near life-size form supporting an oak pole with later gilt-copper repoussé lanterns, redecoration

figures 192cm. and 185cm. high; 6ft. 3 1/2in., 6ft. 3/4in. lamp standards 248cm. high; 8ft. 1 1/2in.

To request a Condition Report, please contact Oana.Barbu@sothebys.com


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

According to family tradition acquired by Agnes Anstruther-Thomson (1860-1941) for the dining room at Charleton, Colinsburgh, Fife;
Her daughter Grizel Ansthruther-Thompson, Baroness Knunt Bonde (1882-1970);
thence by descent.
Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd, 'Family Seats: Heirs to Charleton's Edwardian Splendours', The Field, 26 October 1985, p.58. photographed in the dining room; 
Scottish Field,
January 1990, photographed in the dining room for the front cover;
William Kay, 'Charleton, Fife', Country Life, 22 February 1990, p.99, photographed in the dining room.

Agnes Anstruther-Thomson was the daughter of James Alexander Guthrie, a director of the Bank of England. In 1882, she married the prominent Scottish landowner Charles Anstruther-Thomson (1855-1922). A fashionable member of London society, she held salons at the couple’s townhouse in Rutland Gate. Her sister-in-law, the writer and artist Clementina Anstruther-Thomson (1857–1921), was a close friend and student of John Singer Sargent, Agnes sat for Sargent in 1898 as Clementina had a decade earlier in 1889.


Charles and Agnes undertook extensive alterations to the house and gardens when Charles inherited the estate in 1904. Robert Lorimer (1864–1929) was commissioned to redesign the 18th century house. He created a new formal entrance on the north side, replete with a screen-wall incorporating busts and created an extraordinary set of interior spaces, including a long hall or gallery running north to south. These altered spaces gave Agnes the opportunity to display, not only inherited family pieces, but also her own acquisitions, which included salvaged architectural fragments. This combination of Lorimer's use of revival vernacular detail and Agnes' historic fixtures is a theatrical tour de force. It included the installation in the dining room of an imposing Italian classical door frame around the chimney-piece, said to have been acquired from the artist Sargent. It was this dramatic feature, where the figures offered here were positioned.