View full screen - View 1 of Lot 16. A George II parcel-gilt and burr walnut mirror, circa 1730-40.
16

A George II parcel-gilt and burr walnut mirror, circa 1730-40

UK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

15,000 - 25,000 GBP

Property of a Private British Collector

A George II parcel-gilt and burr walnut mirror, circa 1730-40

A George II parcel-gilt and burr walnut mirror, circa 1730-40

Estimate:

15,000 - 25,000 GBP

Property of a Private British Collector

A George II parcel-gilt and burr walnut mirror, circa 1730-40


the swan-neck pediment centred by a cartouche with inverted breakfront frieze, the rectangular bevelled plate between oak leaf festoons and the shaped apron with applied pierced decoration, with later brass candlearms

152cm. high, 81cm. wide; 5ft., 2ft. 8in.

In good restored condition. This decorative mirror is ready to hang. There is some minor rubbing to the later gilt decoration.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Acquired from Apter Fredericks Ltd. at the Grosvenor House Antiques Fair, 18 June 1992.
The form of this architectural ‘tabernacle’ mirror can trace its lineage to the niches of classical temples of antiquity and which became a hugely popular exponent of neo-Palladian design in the 1730s and beyond. For a closely related tabernacle mirror, see Adam Bowett, English Furniture 1660-1714, From Charles II to Queen Anne, Antique Collectors Club, 2002, p. 298, pl. 6:63. Bowett notes these frames were principally the preserve of carvers however veneered examples, such as the present lot, were produced by the workshops of cabinet-maker's.