View full screen - View 1 of Lot 10. Untitled.
10

Takashi Murakami

Untitled

Property from an Important Private European Collection | Provenant d'une Importante Collection Particulière Européenne

9

10

12

Takashi Murakami

Takashi Murakami

Untitled

Untitled

Property from an Important Private European Collection

Takashi Murakami

b.1962

Untitled


signed and dated 2016 on the stretcher

acrylic and gold leaf on canvas

170 x 145 cm ; 66 15/16 x 57 1/16 in.

Executed in 2016.

_____________________________________________________________


Provenant d'une Importante Collection Particulière Européenne

Takashi Murakami

n.1962

Sans titre


signé et daté 2016 sur le châssis

acrylique et feuilles d'or sur toile

170 x 145 cm ; 66 15/16 x 57 1/16 in.

Exécuté en 2016.

To request a Condition Report, please contact joelle.koops@sothebys.com


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Galerie Perrotin, Paris

Private Collection, Europe (acquired from the above in 2016)

_____________________________________________________________


Galerie Perrotin, Paris

Collection Particulière, Europe (acquis auprès de cette dernière en 2016)

Paris, Galerie Perrotin, Takashi Murakami. Learning the magic of painting, 10 September - 23 December 2016

_____________________________________________________________


Paris, Galerie Perrotin, Takashi Murakami. Learning the magic of painting, 10 septembre - 23 décembre 2016

The skull motif appeared in Murakami's work in the 1990s, alongside his famous smiling multicolored flowers. The painting’s surface is covered with superimposed skulls in light relief, creating a play between two and three dimensions in a manner associated with the Superflat movement. The skulls form the background and are simultaneously the main subject of the work. This motif symbolizes the transience of life, both in Buddhist culture and in the tradition of the vanities of European painting. These allegorical representations of the passage of time and the vacuity of passions emerged particularly in the 17th century but also constituted a Warholian motif in 1976 with the artist’s series of memento mori, entitled Skulls. Murakami thus pays homage to the heritage of pop art in this work. He tackles a seemingly macabre subject and transforms it through the multiplication of skulls and the use of gold leaf. He thus creates a work that immediately catches the viewer's gaze, magnifying and surpassing the theme of vanity.

Takashi Murakami shifts between various influences with this work. He associates one of his iconic motifs with the use of gold leaf. He thus combines fine art and pop culture, a kawaii aesthetic and a heritage of Japanese art. Murakami studied at the University of Tokyo where he obtained a doctorate in Nihonga painting. This movement, which appeared in the 1880s, characterizes the works produced according to the conventions and techniques of "traditional" Japanese painting, as opposed to painting in a Western style then in vogue in Japan. The use of gold leaf covering the entire surface of the canvas recalls the backgrounds of works from the Edo or Meiji periods. It simultaneously evokes the gold backgrounds of the Italian Byzantine painters.

_____________________________________________________________


Le motif du crâne, apparu dans l’œuvre de Murakami dans les années 1990 constitue, au côté des fleurs souriantes multicolores, sa véritable signature artistique. La surface de la toile est ainsi recouverte de crânes superposés en léger relief, opérant un jeu entre volume et bi-dimensionnalité, indissociable du mouvement Superflat. Les crânes constituent l’arrière-plan et simultanément le sujet principal de l’œuvre. Ce motif symbolise l’impermanence de la vie, aussi bien dans la culture bouddhiste que dans la tradition des vanités de la peinture européenne. Ces représentations allégoriques de l’écoulement du temps et de la vacuité des passions se développent particulièrement au XVIIe siècle mais constituent également un motif warholien en 1976 avec sa série de memento mori, intitulée Skulls. A travers cette œuvre, Murakami rend hommage à l’héritage de pop art. Il reprend un sujet d’apparence macabre, tout en le métamorphosant par la multiplication des crânes et le recours à la feuille d’or. Il crée de fait une œuvre qui retient immédiatement le regard du spectateur, magnifiant et dépassant le thème de la vanité.

Avec cette œuvre, Takashi Murakami opère un véritable travail de fusion entre diverses influences. Il associe en effet l’un de ses motifs iconiques à l’utilisation de la feuille d’or. Il mêle ainsi beaux-arts et pop culture, esthétique kawaii et héritage de l’art japonais. Murakami a étudié à l’université de Tokyo où il est devenu docteur en peinture Nihonga. Ce mouvement, apparu dans les années 1880, caractérise des œuvres réalisées selon les conventions et techniques de la peinture japonaise « traditionnelle », par opposition à la peinture dans un style occidental alors en vogue au Japon. L’usage de la feuille d’or recouvrant l’intégralité de la surface de la toile rappelle les arrière-plans d’œuvres des époques Edo ou Meiji. Elle évoque simultanément les fonds d’or des primitifs italiens.