View full screen - View 1 of Lot 145. PIETER DE BLOOT  |  PEASANTS DRINKING AND SMOKING IN AN INTERIOR.
145

PIETER DE BLOOT | PEASANTS DRINKING AND SMOKING IN AN INTERIOR

Estimate:

40,000 to - 60,000 USD

Property from Lawrence Steigrad Fine Arts, New York

PIETER DE BLOOT | PEASANTS DRINKING AND SMOKING IN AN INTERIOR

PIETER DE BLOOT | PEASANTS DRINKING AND SMOKING IN AN INTERIOR

Estimate:

40,000 to - 60,000 USD

Property from Lawrence Steigrad Fine Arts, New York

PIETER DE BLOOT

Rotterdam circa 1601/2 - 1658

PEASANTS DRINKING AND SMOKING IN AN INTERIOR


signed on the stone well: P. De Bloot

oil on oval panel

unframed: 13¼x 14⅓in.; 34 x 37 cm.

framed: 23 x 28 in.; 58.4 x 71.1 cm.

The oval panel is flat, stable, uncradled, and comprised of three boards brought together by two horizontal joins. The joins appear stable and have no reinforcements added. Overall the painting is in very fresh condition, with strong retention of paint and saturation of colors, notably in the figures clothing and faces. UV light reveals a few small scattered retouches in the dark background and along the joins, which is typical for a panel picture of this time and place. Otherwise the painting is in very good condition and may be hung in its current condition. In a carved wooden frame.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

C.P.A. & G.R. Castendijk, Rotterdam, by 1989;

With Drs. Salomon Lilian, Amsterdam, by 1997;

Charles Roelofsz, Amsterdam, 1999,

From whom acquired by a private collector, Washington, D.C.;

From whom acquired. 

Tableau, XII, no. 1, September 1989, in an advertisement for C.P.A. & G.R. Castendijk,

Rotterdam, for the Fine Art and Antiques Fair, Prinsenhof Museum, Delft;

R. James, “Pieter de Bloot, Boereninterieur, ca. 1635-1640” in Rotterdamse Meesters

uit de Gouden Eeuw, Historisch Museum, Rotterdam, Waanders Uitgevers, Zwolle, 1994,

pp. 170-171, 206, cat. no. 7, illustrated twice;

S. Lilian, “Pieter de Bloot” in Old Master Paintings, 1997, p. 12- 13, illustrated.

Rotterdam, Historisch Museum, Rotterdamse Meesters uit de Gouden Eeuw, 15 October 1994 – 15 January 1995, no. 7.


"This peasant family is engaging in different vices—drinking, smoking, and eating—and is amusing even if they are meant to warn the viewer against excess. Despite the “lowlife” subject, De Bloot has painted certain elements of the composition with great sensitivity, like the exhaled smoke from the rightmost man"


Molly Harrington



Pieter de Bloot lived all his life in Rotterdam. He earned a reputation as a painter of

tavern scenes and quarreling peasants. De Bloot appears to have been strongly influenced by Adriaen Brouwer (1605 – 1638) and David Teniers the Younger (1610 – 1690). De Bloot’s genre paintings of common townsfolk remain, however, distinctly Dutch, particularly in the execution of the faces. Also characteristic of de Bloot, as demonstrated in this work, are the still-life elements that he puts in his interiors. He also painted religious scenes as well as a few landscapes. Works by the artist can be found in the museums of: Amsterdam; Brussels; Cambridge, U.S.; Cambridge, U.K.; Florence; Greenwich, U.K.; The Hague; London; Paris; Philadelphia; Prague; Rotterdam; Saint Petersburg; Utrecht; Vienna; and Wuppertal. De Bloot rarely dated his works. When the present panel was shown in the 1994 exhibition in Rotterdam, the date of execution was fixed as circa 1635-1640, at which point there is a further notable influence by Herman and Cornelis Saftleven. What is most striking in this work is the soft coloration imbued by a subtle interplay of light and shadow. Around a table near a fireplace, three men and a woman with a child are thoroughly enjoying themselves while drinking and smoking. A fourth man to their left watches the revelry while also indulging. Simple household items are scattered throughout, with perhaps such items as the broken jar, idle broom, and discarded mussel shells scattered on the floor intended as a warning sign against sloth.