View full screen - View 1 of Lot 144. ANTWERP SCHOOL, CIRCA 1650'S | A BOUQUET OF NARCISSUS, PARROT TULIP, ROSES AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A STONE PLINTH.
144

ANTWERP SCHOOL, CIRCA 1650'S | A BOUQUET OF NARCISSUS, PARROT TULIP, ROSES AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A STONE PLINTH

Estimate:

30,000

to
- 40,000 USD

Property from Lawrence Steigrad Fine Arts, New York

ANTWERP SCHOOL, CIRCA 1650'S | A BOUQUET OF NARCISSUS, PARROT TULIP, ROSES AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A STONE PLINTH

ANTWERP SCHOOL, CIRCA 1650'S | A BOUQUET OF NARCISSUS, PARROT TULIP, ROSES AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A STONE PLINTH

Estimate:

30,000

to
- 40,000 USD

Lot sold:

32,500

USD

Property from Lawrence Steigrad Fine Arts, New York

ANTWERP SCHOOL, CIRCA 1650'S

A BOUQUET OF NARCISSUS, PARROT TULIP, ROSES AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A STONE PLINTH


oil on copper

unframed: 14 1/4 x 10 1/2  in.; 37.5 x 27.5 cm.

framed: 20 1/2 x 16 3/4 in.; 52 x 42.5 cm.

The copper panel is flat and healthy, with only minor undulations in the metal plate perceptible. The picture is in overall good condition and appears to have recently had a thoughtful restoration. The varnish is clean, and the picture could certainly be hung in its current condition. UV light reveals a few scattered retouches along the edges, which is likely due to old frame abrasion. A couple of other retouches are visible in the darkest areas of the two roses, and in the dark background. Otherwise, the bright colors are well preserved and present beautifully. In a carved wooden frame.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Anonymous sale, London, Christie’s, 19 April 2000, lot 302 (as Follower of Nicolaes van Veerendael), for $82,063;

With Richard Green, London (as Simon Verelst);

Private collection, Europe. 

"As is common with 17th century still lifes, this beautiful bouquet is both highly realistic and pure fantasy, as these particular flowers would not all bloom at the same time. The bold colors against the dark background give the painting a modern feel that is very decorative."


Molly Harrington



Dr. Fred G. Meijer regards this beautifully preserved copper as an excellent example of the Antwerp School, executed sometime in the 1650s.The importance of the work having been painted in Antwerp, circa 1650s, is understandable only through the history of the city itself. By the sixteenth century Antwerp was the leading commercial and financial center of Europe, a power which it maintained through the middle of the seventeenth century. It further held a leading role in the art world. Paintings in Antwerp were regularly purchased by both the upper and middle classes, which ultimately led to wealthy individuals becoming “more than mere consumers. They developed into collectors and connoisseurs.”1 Collecting came to be closely associated with the aristocracy, even if one had a mercantile background. Thus, it was viewed as a “noble activity” and art collecting in Antwerp took on a symbolic dimension. 1. B. Timmermans, “Networkers and Mediators in Seventeenth Century Antwerp Art World: the Impact of Collectors-Connoisseurs on Artistic Processes of Transmission and Selection” in Luxury in the Low Countries, Brussels 2010, pp. 111- 112, 114.