View full screen - View 1 of Lot 143. JEAN-MICHEL PICART  |  TULIPS, DAFFODILS, CARNATIONS, POPPIES, ANEMONES, AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A WOODEN LEDGE;  TULIPS, LILIES, DAFFODILS, LILACS, AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A WOODEN LEDGE: A PAIR.
143

JEAN-MICHEL PICART | TULIPS, DAFFODILS, CARNATIONS, POPPIES, ANEMONES, AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A WOODEN LEDGE; TULIPS, LILIES, DAFFODILS, LILACS, AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A WOODEN LEDGE: A PAIR

Estimate:

80,000

to
- 120,000 USD

Property from Lawrence Steigrad Fine Arts, New York

JEAN-MICHEL PICART | TULIPS, DAFFODILS, CARNATIONS, POPPIES, ANEMONES, AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A WOODEN LEDGE; TULIPS, LILIES, DAFFODILS, LILACS, AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A WOODEN LEDGE: A PAIR

JEAN-MICHEL PICART | TULIPS, DAFFODILS, CARNATIONS, POPPIES, ANEMONES, AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A WOODEN LEDGE; TULIPS, LILIES, DAFFODILS, LILACS, AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A WOODEN LEDGE: A PAIR

Estimate:

80,000

to
- 120,000 USD

Property from Lawrence Steigrad Fine Arts, New York

JEAN-MICHEL PICART

Antwerp 1600 - 1682 Paris

TULIPS, DAFFODILS, CARNATIONS, POPPIES, ANEMONES, AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A WOODEN LEDGE; TULIPS, LILIES, DAFFODILS, LILACS, AND OTHER FLOWERS IN A GLASS VASE ON A WOODEN LEDGE: A PAIR


both, oil on canvas

each unframed: 21 7/12 x 18 5/12 in.; 55.2 x 47 cm.

each framed: 26½ x 23 in.; 67.3 x 58.4 cm.

(2)

Both paintings have the same coarse relining. The relining is rather stiff and as a result the paint has thinned somewhat over time. Despite this, both pictures are clean, and the bright colors have retained their freshness well. UV light reveals some scattered retouches in the dark red flowers in both pictures, along with the dark backgrounds and in a few areas of craquelure. They have been applied well, and they could be hung in their current condition. Both in carved, giltwood frames.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Villa d’Agilè, Turin.

"There is something very modern about these still lifes, even as they evoke the extravagance of the seventeenth century. The simple backgrounds contrasted with the bold palette and complex composition bring a mix of both starkness and warmth that I find extremely satisfying."


Calvine Harvey


No documentation exists detailing Picart’s training in Antwerp, nor was he a member of the guild. It is thought that perhaps he trained at the studio of the Francken family. By 1635 Picart was living in Paris, where he was part of a group of Flemish artists in Saint-Germain-des-Prés. In 1640 he joined the Academy of St. Luke. By 1645, although a widower twice over, he remarried. Happily, this union lasted for the next 35 years. Picart prospered in Paris both as a painter and art dealer. By the second half of the 1600s, his flower and fruit pieces were highly sought after by many French collectors as well as Louis XIV. His still lifes were widely collected during the second half of the seventeenth century; at least seven of his paintings hung at Versailles and another eight at the Château de Marly. With this extraordinary level of royal patronage in mind it is none too surprising that, in his 1666-8 treatise Entretiens sur les vies et sur les ouvrages des plus excellents peintres..., André Félibien placed Picart's name amongst those of the greatest ancient and modern painters. A similar pair in size and subject can be found in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, United Kingdom. All have flowers in glass vases on wooden ledges set against dark backgrounds. Fallen petals, as occur in all four of these examples, were a favored motif. Fred Meijer has endorsed the attribution of this pair to Picart, based on firsthand inspection. 


1. C. Wright, “Jean-Michel Picart” in The French Painters of the Seventeenth Century, Little, Brown, and Company, Boston, 1981, p. 241.