View full screen - View 1 of Lot 16. THOMAS GAINSBOROUGH, R.A.  |  A WOODED LANDSCAPE.
16

THOMAS GAINSBOROUGH, R.A. | A WOODED LANDSCAPE

Estimate:

12,000

to
- 18,000 GBP

PROPERTY FROM ANDREW CLAYTON-PAYNE, LONDON

THOMAS GAINSBOROUGH, R.A. | A WOODED LANDSCAPE

THOMAS GAINSBOROUGH, R.A. | A WOODED LANDSCAPE

Estimate:

12,000

to
- 18,000 GBP

Lot sold:

15,000

GBP

PROPERTY FROM ANDREW CLAYTON-PAYNE, LONDON

THOMAS GAINSBOROUGH, R.A.

Sudbury 1727-1788 London

A WOODED LANDSCAPE


inscribed verso: Gainsborough delt

pencil on laid paper

unframed: 15 x 19 cm., 5⅞ x 7 ¼ in.

framed: 34.5 by 38.5 cm, 13 1/2 by 15 1/2 in.


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The pencil has remained bold and easily readable in this drawing. The paper may have yellowed very slightly (particularly along some parts of the extreme of the sheet) but this is very minor. Overall the work is well preserved.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

H.W. Underdown;

Henry S. Reitlinger;

His sale, London, Sotheby’s, 1954, lot 146;

With Agnew’s, London;

Colin Clark (son of Kenneth Clark);

Private collection, USA.

M. Woodall, Gainsborough’s Landscape Drawings, London 1939, p. 33, no. 270;

J. Hayes, The Drawings of Thomas Gainsborough, London 1971, p. 140, no. 114, reproduced pl. 357.

London, Arts Council, Gainsborough Drawings, 1960-1961, no. 6

"‘If I were to rest his reputation upon one point, it should be on his Drawings...no man ever possessed methods so various in producing effect, and all excellent...’, so wrote Gainsborough’s friend and earlier biographer William Jackson in 1798. Gainsborough is famously understood to have drawn, not for commercial reasons, but purely for his own pleasure. With a deep-rooted love of rural England, he found solace from the pressures of his flourishing portrait painting practice by regularly escaping into the countryside around his adopted home of Bath.


The present sheet is a fine example of Gainsborough’s draughtsmanship of the 1750s. Still a young man in his 30s, he had already developed a highly sophisticated drawing technique. Of note here is the obvious confidence of line and his preoccupation with the subtle gradations of light and shade within the ancient woodland."


Mark Griffith-Jones


The drawing has been dated by Hayes to the mid-1750s. Hayes describes the pencil work as similar to the panoramic landscape at Yale (see Hayes, under Literature) but the foliage in the present work is more rounded and less angular treatment making it closer in character to the Wooded Landscape with Donkeys in the Morgan Library and Museum, New York (Hayes, 1971, no. 111). "‘If I were to rest his reputation upon one point, it should be on his Drawings...no man ever possessed methods so various in producing effect, and all excellent...’, so wrote Gainsborough’s friend and earlier biographer William Jackson in 1798. Gainsborough is famously understood to have drawn, not for commercial reasons, but purely for his own pleasure. With a deep-rooted love of rural England, he found solace from the pressures of his flourishing portrait painting practice by regularly escaping into the countryside around his adopted home of Bath.