View 1 of Lot 27. Paire de daims agenouillés en cuivre doré Dynastie Qing, XVIIIE-XIXE siècle | 清十八至十九世紀 鎏金銅臥鹿一對 | A pair of gilt-copper kneeling deer figures, Qing Dynasty, 18th-19th century.
View 1 of Lot 27. Paire de daims agenouillés en cuivre doré Dynastie Qing, XVIIIE-XIXE siècle | 清十八至十九世紀 鎏金銅臥鹿一對 | A pair of gilt-copper kneeling deer figures, Qing Dynasty, 18th-19th century.
27

Paire de daims agenouillés en cuivre doré Dynastie Qing, XVIIIE-XIXE siècle | 清十八至十九世紀 鎏金銅臥鹿一對 | A pair of gilt-copper kneeling deer figures, Qing Dynasty, 18th-19th century

Estimate:

8,000 - 12,000 EUR

Collection Particulière Suisse | 瑞士私人收藏

Paire de daims agenouillés en cuivre doré Dynastie Qing, XVIIIE-XIXE siècle | 清十八至十九世紀 鎏金銅臥鹿一對 | A pair of gilt-copper kneeling deer figures, Qing Dynasty, 18th-19th century

Paire de daims agenouillés en cuivre doré Dynastie Qing, XVIIIE-XIXE siècle | 清十八至十九世紀 鎏金銅臥鹿一對 | A pair of gilt-copper kneeling deer figures, Qing Dynasty, 18th-19th century

Estimate:

8,000 - 12,000 EUR

Lot sold:

20,160

EUR

Collection Particulière Suisse

瑞士私人收藏


Paire de daims agenouillés en cuivre doré Dynastie Qing, XVIIIE-XIXE siècle

清十八至十九世紀 鎏金銅臥鹿一對

A pair of gilt-copper kneeling deer figures, Qing Dynasty, 18th-19th century


tous les deux agenouillés, leurs têtes dressées en alerte, socles rectangulaires lotiformes

H. 26,7 cm, 10½ in.

高 26.7 公分, 10½ 英寸

Galerie Koller, September 20, 2003, lot 41.

Koller 藝廊,2003年9月30日, 編號 41

A pair of male and female kneeling deer (mriga) worshipping a wheel of the law (dharmachakra) is one of the earliest emblems of Buddhism, seen carved on Kushan period (1st-3rd c) Buddhist sculpture, such as a Gandhara schist panel in the British Museum, see W. Zwalf, Gandhara Sculpture in the British Museum, London, 1996, Vol. I, pl. IX, cat. no. 199. The deer symbolise the First Sermon given by the historical Buddha shortly after he attained enlightenment at the vajrasana site in Bodh Gaya. The Buddha is said to have taught the Four Noble Truths to disciples gathered in the deer park (mrigadawa) at Sarnath. The deer are said to have been attracted by the Buddha’s serene presence and joined the disciples. The male and female deer together symbolise harmony and fidelity, and in Chinese mythology are symbols of longevity. Gilt copper deer flanking a dharmachakra wheel are often placed on altars or monastery roofs in Tibet, Mongolia and China, such as those above the gates of the Jokhang, Lhasa, see Giuseppe Tucci, Tibet: Land of Snows, Calcutta, Bombay, New Delhi, 1967, p. 62, pl. 24.


Gilt copper deer are often depicted in a recumbent posture with all four legs folded beneath the bodies, such as the pair sold in these rooms, December 16, 2010, lot 85, while those kneeling with only their front legs folded, like the present examples, are rare, cf. the similar kneeling posture of a gilt copper single-horned male deer from the collection of Eduard von der Heydt in Museum Rietberg, see Blanche Christine Olschak, Mystic Art of Ancient Tibet, Boston & London, 1987, p. 56