View full screen - View 1 of Lot 137. AFTER DIEGO RODRÍGUEZ DE SILVA Y VELÁZQUEZ | TRIUMPH OF BACCHUS.
137

AFTER DIEGO RODRÍGUEZ DE SILVA Y VELÁZQUEZ | TRIUMPH OF BACCHUS

AFTER DIEGO RODRÍGUEZ DE SILVA Y VELÁZQUEZ | TRIUMPH OF BACCHUS

AFTER DIEGO RODRÍGUEZ DE SILVA Y VELÁZQUEZ | TRIUMPH OF BACCHUS

AFTER DIEGO RODRÍGUEZ DE SILVA Y VELÁZQUEZ

TRIUMPH OF BACCHUS


oil on canvas, laid down on panel

61¼ by 87 in.; 155.6 by 221 cm.

The canvas is laid on a panel or board probably consisting of multiple planks, given its size, and supported on the reverse by another coarse-weave canvas. To the naked eye, several spots in the shadows of the figures' clothing and flesh tones appear darker, suggesting areas of restoration. A small amount of frame abrasion is visible along the left edge. Under UV inspection, retouching is visible in patches throughout areas of shadow, most of which are also visible to the naked eye. Offered in a decoratively painted black, red, and giltwood frame. 


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE. 

This painting is a 19th century copy after Velázquez's original Feast of Bacchus in the Museo del Prado, Madrid.1 In Velázquez's first mythological painting, he combined the study of the male nude with a color palette and figural types drawn from his rougher genre paintings from his years in Seville. The unidealized figure at center looks directly at the viewer, inviting us to imagine ourselves in this fantastical scene, and has been interpreted as a satire on antiquity and classical learning. With this combination of classical fable and everyday, lower-class subjects, Velázquez demonstrated that naturalism could serve all subject matter, not only genre painting. Nineteenth-century artists were especially drawn to Velazquez's unidealized rendering of figures, which was paralleled in the works of contemporary artists like Gustave Courbet and Edouard Manet. 


1. Diego Velázquez, Feast of Bacchus, c. 1628-9, oil on canvas, 165 by 225 cm. Museo del Prado, Madrid, inv. no. P001170.