Dickens, American Notes for General Circulation, 1842, first edition, presentation copy inscribed to Carlyle
Dickens, American Notes for General Circulation, 1842, first edition, presentation copy inscribed to Carlyle
Dickens, American Notes for General Circulation, 1842, first edition, presentation copy inscribed to Carlyle
83

Dickens, American Notes for General Circulation, 1842, first edition, presentation copy inscribed to Carlyle

Estimate: 35,000 - 50,000 GBP

Dickens, American Notes for General Circulation, 1842, first edition, presentation copy inscribed to Carlyle

Estimate: 35,000 - 50,000 GBP

Lot Sold:47,500GBP

Lot Details

Description

DICKENS, CHARLES

American Notes for General Circulation. London: Chapman and Hall, 1842


8vo (199 x 124mm.), 2 volumes, FIRST EDITION, AUTHOR'S PRESENTATION COPY INSCRIBED TO THOMAS CARLYLE THE DAY AFTER PUBLICATION ("Thomas Carlyle | From Charles Dickens, | Nineteenth October, 1842"), half-titles, advertisement leaf at front of volume 1, 6pp. advertisements at end of volume 2, original dark greyish-brown horizontally-ribbed cloth with floral frame in blind on covers, spines lettered in gilt, pale yellow endpapers, preserved in green morocco pull-off box, covers of volume 2 nearly detached, hinges to volume 1 starting, spines slightly faded, some slight edge-wear to cloth


The philosopher and historian Thomas Carlyle (1795–1881) was one of Dickens' lifelong friends. They first met in the early 1840s at a dinner with the politican Edward Stanley, after which Carlyle produced a vivid description of his first impressions of the novelist: "clear blue intelligent eyes, eyebrows that he arches amazingly, large protrusive rather loose mouth - a face of the most extreme mobility..." (quoted by Tomalin, p.112). Dickens came to revere him greatly, and was heavily influenced by his historian friend's thinking on social matters, once remarking, "I would go at all times farther to see Carlyle than any man alive" (Forster, 839). Dickens' biting social satire Hard Times, set in the northern industrial city of Coketown (probably modelled on Preston, see lot 166) and focussing on the obsessively factual and unimaginative educational system developed by Mr Gradgrind, was dedicated to the historian. Later he was inspired by Carlyle's study of the French Revolution to compose his highly popular historical adventure novel, A Tale of Two Cities.


This first edition of American Notes, Dickens controversial travel book for Chapman and Hall following his first visit there in 1842 (see note, previous lot) was published on 18 October (the day before the author inscribed this copy to Carlyle), and no doubt Dickens was immediately keen for his new eminent social commentator friend to receive a copy of his own piece of social commentary on the United States.


REFERENCE:

Smith II:3


PROVENANCE:

Thomas Carlyle, authorial inscription; William W. Allis of Milwaukee, the sale of his library at the Anderson Auction Company, 25/26 March 1912, lot 250; Edwin W. Coggeshaw, sale of his library at Anderson Galleries, 25-27 April 1916, lot 111 

Condition Report

Condition is described in the main body of the cataloguing, where appropriate.


We are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE.

Charles Dickens: The Lawrence Drizen Collection
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