A James Dean-Era Mercury & Iconic Ford Cars from the Company’s Former Director

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Launch Slideshow

Longtime Ford Motor Company director Michael Dingman had an abiding passion for the company’s iconic flathead V-8 models, as well as an eye for the most exquisite original neon signs and other nostalgia representing the great American Century. This June, RM Sotheby’s will offer hundreds of items from his important collection in Hampton, New Hampshire. Ahead, view ten automobile highlights, including a 1939 Ford, among the most popular year with collectors, and an iconic Mercury, similar to the model featured in James Dean’s Rebel Without a Cause

The Dingman Collection
23–24 June | Hampton

A James Dean-Era Mercury & Iconic Ford Cars from the Company’s Former Director

  • Darin Schnabel ©2018 Courtesy o/Darin Schnabel ©2018 Courtesy o
    1938 Ford V-8 Station Wagon. Estimate $80,000–160,000. Offered without reserve.
    In 1938, for the first time, Ford’s Standard and DeLuxe series were differentiated by their front-end sheet metal. Through 1940, each year’s Standard cars had hoods and grilles similar to the previous year’s DeLuxe, with slight differences, while DeLuxe cars had a completely different look. For station wagons , 1938 marked a milestone: they were finally recognized as passenger cars, elevated from the commercial catalogue. 

    The Dingman Collection
    23–24 June | Hampton
  • 2018 © RM Auctions Inc.
    1939 Lincoln-Zephyr Convertible Sedan. Estimate $190,000–220,000. Offered without reserve.
    The very rare convertible sedan offered here was one of just 302 built in 1939, a year that the Lincoln-Zephyr adopted new hydraulic brakes and modest styling changes, including a redesigned grille, bumpers, and doors with flanged sills, covering the running boards. This Zephyr has been well maintained in its current owner’s collection since 2012, with the intention of preserving its as-new appearance. 

    The Dingman Collection
    23–24 June | Hampton
  • 2018 © RM Auctions Inc.
    1939 Ford V-8 DeLuxe Station Wagon. Estimate $80,000–100,000. Offered without reserve.
    The beautifully hand-built 1939 Ford V-8 DeLuxe station wagon represents, in many ways, the best of both the old and the new. This largely unrestored Woodie shows its years gracefully and in good character. It is one of the most iconic examples of what may be the greatest Ford station wagon ever made. 

    The Dingman Collection
    23–24 June | Hampton
  • Rasy Ran ©2018 Courtesy of RM A
    1939 Ford V-8 DeLuxe Convertible Coupe. Estimate $100,000–125,000. Offered without reserve.
    The 1939 Fords had 24-stud cylinder heads and long-awaited hydraulic brakes, as well as several important design evolutions. This superb DeLuxe convertible coupe was the recipient of a beautiful, high-quality restoration in the elegant year-correct color of Folkstone Gray, with a complementary rich brown leather interior and black soft top, piped in red. 

    The Dingman Collection
    23–24 June | Hampton
  • Darin Schnabel ©2018 Courtesy o/Darin Schnabel ©2018 Courtesy o
    1940 Ford ½-Ton Pickup. Estimate $50,000–75,000. Offered without reserve.
    Ford’s light-duty trucks, redesigned in 1938, received yet another makeover for 1940. Believed to be of Canadian manufacture, this handsome 1940 Ford ½-ton pickup is painted in the familiar Acadia Green, specific to that year, and accented by Straw striping on the belt molding. “The Farm” is lettered on the doors in matching color. 

    The Dingman Collection
    23–24 June | Hampton
  • Darin Schnabel ©2018 Courtesy o/Darin Schnabel ©2018 Courtesy o
    1946 Ford Super DeLuxe Convertible. Estimate $60,000–90,000. Offered without reserve.
    Ford was the first American automaker to restart production after World War II. Shortly after VE Day, the War Production Board okayed the opening of the passenger car assembly lines, and on 3 July 1945, the first 1946 Ford made its way down. Built toward the end of the 1946 model year, this car has been meticulously maintained.

    The Dingman Collection
    23–24 June | Hampton
  • 2018 © RM Auctions Inc.
    1949 Ford Custom Convertible. Estimate $110,000–140,000. Offered without reserve.
    Ford was first, showing all-new 1949 models on 8 June 1948. They were as un-Ford-like as anything the public had ever seen. Slab-sided and streamlined, the company proudly announced that the New York Fashion Academy had judged Ford the “Fashion Car of the Year.” Although Ford’s station wagon was the most expensive 1949 model, the convertible carried the most prestige. This fastidiously restored example is without a doubt one of the best available in today’s market, presented just as it would have been at your local Ford dealer. 

    The Dingman Collection
    23–24 June | Hampton
  • 1950 Mercury 72B Club Coupe. Estimate $40,000–60,000. Offered without reserve.
    The Mercury version became a favorite of young rodders and customizers, particularly after a mildly modified ’49 club coupe was featured in the James Dean film Rebel Without a Cause. Entered once in judging competition, this car was scrutinized at a National Early Ford V-8 Club meeting in Missouri, where it received the Rouge Award for originality. It subsequently appeared on the cover of V-8 Times, the Club’s magazine, a copy of which is included with this lot.

    The Dingman Collection
    23–24 June | Hampton
  • 2018 © RM Auctions Inc.
    1951 Ford Custom Country Squire. Estimate $100,000–120,000. Offered without reserve.
    The 1951 Country Squire was a vehicle of firsts and lasts for Ford. It marked, in many ways, the transition of the station wagon from a utilitarian pre-war hauler to a comfortable post-war family car. It was the final Ford “woodie” to be decorated with genuine wood, although it no longer served a structural purpose. This Country Squire is offered with an owner’s manual, a selection of related literature, the original jack in its factory bag and even the original four wheels with their blackwall tires that were on the car when the second owner purchased it. 

    The Dingman Collection
    23–24 June | Hampton
  • 2018 © RM Auctions Inc.
    2006 Ford GT. Estimate $300,000–350,000. Offered without reserve.
    Built to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Ford Motor Company, the GT has been a heavily sought-after modern classic ever since the first model rolled off the production line in 2004. The vehicle’s design is a modern homage to the immensely successful GT40 that achieved four consecutive Le Mans victories from 1966 to 1969. 

    The Dingman Collection
    23–24 June | Hampton
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