8 Charming and Historic Cars from RM Hershey

11–12 October | Hershey
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Whether drawn by the scent of chocolate from Hershey's Chocolate World or the sound of classic motor cars making their way toward the auction block, RM Auctions' Hershey sale is not one to be missed. Coinciding with the AACA Eastern Division Fall Meet, one of the largest automotive gatherings in the world, Hershey has earned a reputation as the year’s finest offering of collectible American automobiles. Click ahead to view eight of the most charming and eclectic cars on offer, from a Virgil Exner show-car built for the 1960 Mexican Auto Show to a 1901 Oldsmobile with just two owners from new.

8 Charming and Historic Cars from RM Hershey

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    1934 Lincoln Model KB Dual-Cowl Sport Phaeton. Estimate $110,000–130,000.
    This striking Dual-Cowl coachwork befits the sporty nature of the Lincoln Model KB. One of only two examples produced in this style, and the only known to still exist, this top-of-the-line model for 1934 shows less than 24,000 miles.

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    1932 Marmon Sixteen Close-Coupled Sedan by LeBaron. Estimate $250,000–300,000.
    Colonel Howard Marmon envisioned building his eponymous marque around a single guiding principle: performance. Known for its staid designs and coachwork, relative to the era, the Marmon Sixteen could out accelerate even the mighty Duesenberg Model J, a car which cost three times as much as the Marmon when new.

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    1901 Oldsmobile Model R 'Curved Dash' Runabout. Estimate $50,000–75,000. Offered without reserve.
    One of many automobiles offered from the Richard L. Burdick collection, this turn-of-the-century runabout is a truly remarkable living piece of automotive history. Spectacularly preserved and including its original paint and upholstery, this car was first owned by a five-year-old boy named Victor Hitz who won the car in a raffle at the Chicago Automobile Show after buying a ticket for a nickel. Hitz kept the car until his passing 83 years later, at which point it was acquired by the late Richard L. Burdick, making this quite likely the only two-owner 1901 Oldsmobile in existence.

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    1960 Plymouth Fury Convertible. Estimate $130,000–150,000.
    With its towering tail-fins, a copious amount of bright trim and deluxe luxury features, and a high-performance engine, this 1960 Plymouth Fury represents the best of mid-century space age design. Debuting at the 1960 Mexican International Auto Show, this car was the end of a brief but dramatic period of Virgil Exner’s “Forward Look” of tailfins for Plymouth that began in 1957 with the sales slogan, “Suddenly it’s 1960!”

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    1949 Chrysler Town and Country Convertible. Estimate $120,000–140,000. Offered without reserve.
    One of the many extraordinarily fine automobiles offered from the Lloyd Needham Collection, this rare 1949 Town and Country was ordered new in its eye-catching color of Noel Green Metallic. Superbly restored with exceptional cosmetics and wood, it’s hard to imagine a better mid-century convertible than this one.

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    1912 Marion Model 33 Bobcat. Estimate $60,000–90,000. Offered without reserve.
    Marion, founded in Indianapolis in 1904, is one of the many forgotten pioneers of automobile manufacturing in America. Advertised as “The Car That Has Set Men to Thinking,” early employees included such automotive luminaries as Robert Hassler, Fred Tone and Harry C. Stutz. The car offered here is likely the sole remaining example of the 912 Marion cars built in 1912.

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    1932 Packard Twin Six Individual Custom Convertible Sedan by Dietrich. Estimate $600,000–750,000.
    There is no more prestigious Packard from the Classic Era than the Dietrich Individual Custom. Available as either eight- or twelve-cylinder cars, the Dietrich cars were each effectively unique, customized by the factory to the taste and preferences of their original owners. This example, formerly of the esteemed Bahre Collection, shows an extraordinary restoration and is presented in the elegant colors of Packard Maroon over Plum Leather upholstery.

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    1911 Delahaye 43A Charabanc. Estimate $100,000–150,000.
    This 1911 Delahaye began life as a fire engine built by Société Générale du Carrosserie et de Charronnage of Paris serving southeast France. After very little time in service, it was replaced by a larger unit capable of covering a bigger area. Following its decommission, the Delahaye went to the Musée de l’Automobile du Sud-Est in St. Cannat, Provence, where it remained for many years. Restoration of this unique vehicle was completed in 2016, making it an ideal candidate to use and enjoy on the road.

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