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228

Workshop of Pedro Roldán the Elder

Saint Anthony and the Christ Child

Workshop of Pedro Roldán the Elder

Workshop of Pedro Roldán the Elder

Saint Anthony and the Christ Child

Saint Anthony and the Christ Child

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Workshop of Pedro Roldán the Elder

Seville 1624-1699

Spanish, Seville, 17th century

Saint Anthony and the Christ Child


gilt and polychromed wood

66cm., 26in. overall

Overall the condition of the sculpture is very good with minor dirt and wear to the surface consistent with age. The Christ Child is carved separately and is probably original. The Saint was professionally cleaned and an uncleaned patch is visible on a fold of drapery at the back. The polychromy and gilding are in excellent near-original condition; very well preserved with few visible losses. One or two minor losses to the paint in the hair and cloak. The Christ Child was not cleaned and dirt is visible to the surface. The halo is removable; minor oxidation to the metal. There is some minor stable splitting to the wood visible to the reverse. There are some slightly open joints visible where the feet and costume meet the probably original base. Some wear to the gilding on the base revealing reddish undertones.


Please note that Condition 12 of the Conditions of Business for Buyers (Online Only) is not applicable to this lot.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

This exceptional figure of Saint Anthony of Padua can be convincingly attributed to Pedro Roldán, who was one of the foremost Baroque sculptors active in Seville in the second half of the 17th century. The sculpture is remarkable for the beautifully preserved gold estofado, which finds close parallels within Roldán's autograph oeuvre. The goldwork, which is in near-original condition, is characterised by swirling arabesques filled with gilt striations, and stippled palmette motifs; the underside of the hood and the sleeves are treated with a more restrained dotted decoration.


The Saint Anthony finds a close comparable, compositionally, but, in particular, in the estofado, with the Saint Ignatius Loyola by Roldán in the Museo Nacional Colegio de San Gregorio, the Spanish National Museum of Sculpture in Valladolid (inv. no. CE1126). The Saint Ignatius, which is larger than the present sculpture, standing at 110cm, has closely comparable estofado (similarly set against a black ground, although, as in the present work, this appears dark green today), whilst the delicate facial features with those of the Saint Anthony. Both the Saint Anthony and the Saint Ignatius Loyola find further comparisons in two figures of the Jesuit SS Francis Xavier and Francis Borgia which were presented in the 2009 Matthiesen Fine Art exhibition, The Mystery of Faith (op. cit., no. 14).


Pedro Roldán was one of the finest 17th-century Sevillian sculptors. His four children all became sculptors, including his daughter Luisa Roldán, La Roldána, who is celebrated as one of the great female Spanish sculptors; see her Saint Ginés de la Jara in the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (inv. no. 85.SD.161). Pedro Roldán initially worked for Alonso de Mena in Granada between 1638 and 1646, before moving to Seville where he established himself as the foremost sculptor in the city, teaching at the Academia de Arte between 1662 to 1672. His most famous works are the St Joseph, 1664, in Seville Cathedral, as well as several retable groups: the Descent from the Cross intended for the Convent of S. Francisco, Seville (now Seville Cathedral), and the Entombment, 1670-1672, in the church of the Hospital de la Caridad, Seville. In most of these works he collaborated with the painter Valdés Leal, who completed the polychromy. Roldán's most iconic work is, however, the extraordinary Ferdinand III, commissioned in 1671 for Seville Cathedral ahead of the sitter's canonization.


RELATED LITERATURE

J. Bernales Bellesteros, Pedro Roldán: maestro de escultura (1624-1699), Seville, 1973; M. Trusted, Spanish Sculpture: A Catalogue of the Collection in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 1998; S. L. Stratton-Pruitt and JL. Romero Torres, The Mystery of Faith: An Eye on Spanish Sculpture 1550-1750, exh. cat. Matthiesen Gallery and Coll & Cortes, London and Madrid, 2009; M. Bolanos (ed.) Museo Nacional Colegio de San Gregorio (España), Madrid, 2009, no. 14; J. Roda Peña, Pedro Roldán, escultor, 1624-1699, Madrid, 2012; Trusted, M.  Roldán family. Grove Art Online. Retrieved 16 Jun. 2022, from

https://www-oxfordartonline-com.lonlib.idm.oclc.org/groveart/view/10.1093/gao/9781884446054.001.0001/oao-9781884446054-e-7000072784