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329

Pier Francesco di Jacopo Foschi

Portrait of a young man in a black cap

Estimate:

50,000 - 70,000 USD

Pier Francesco di Jacopo Foschi

Pier Francesco di Jacopo Foschi

Portrait of a young man in a black cap

Portrait of a young man in a black cap

Estimate:

50,000 - 70,000 USD

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Pier Francesco di Jacopo Foschi

Florence 1502 - 1567

Portrait of a young man in a black cap


oil on panel

panel: 29½ by 23¾ in.; 74.9 by 60.3 cm.

framed: 42⅜ by 37¼ in.; 107.6 by 94.6 cm.

The thick panel consists of possibly two vertical planks. The main join has been reinforced on the reverse with a dovetail insert in the upper right. Two thick braces are adhered horizontally to the reverse. The panel is flat. A previous campaign of restoration is visible along the aforementioned split, however, it is not distracting. There noticeable paint loss and lifting along the sitter's left ear in straight line through his left shoulder. Under UV inspection, various signs of retouching are present, for example, in the top right corner of the background, sleeves of doublet, and cheeks. We recommend contacting an independent restorer to discuss any repairs. Offered in a giltwood and painted carved frame.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Probably, Sir Thomas Gage Saunders Sebright (1802–1864), 8th Baronet Sebright of Besford, Beechwood Park, England;
Thence by descent to Sir Giles Edward Sebright (1896–1954), 13th Baronet Sebright of Besford, Beechwood Park, England;
Thence sold by Christie's, London, 2 July 1937, lot 120 (as by Pontormo);
With Ettore Sestieri, Rome (as by Pontormo).
A. Pinelli, "Pierfrancesco di Jacopo Foschi," in Gazette des Beaux Arts, vol. 69, Paris 1967, p. 99, p. 105, no. 25, reproduced.
Foschi received his training from two influential artists of the Florentine Cinquecento—Andrea del Sarto and Jacopo Pontormo; he worked in the former's studio until his death in 1530, and in 1536 assisted the latter with the fresco decorations (now destroyed) of the loggia of the Villa Medici of Careggi, just outside of Florence.  This portrait, which is datable to the 1530s, reveals the profound influence that both artists, especially Pontormo, had on Foschi's style. It shares with the portraits of Pontormo a deep psychological intensity and sense of intimacy. Highly typical of both Foschi and Pontormo's manner is in the placement of the sitter in the forefront of the picture plane, the sculptural treatment of drapery rendered in sharp, delineated planes, the angularity of the sitter's physiognomy, and the muted palette of blacks, browns and grays, highlighted with dashes of white, as seen here in the book at lower left and the delicate lace collar and ties peeking out of the sitter's jacket. Indeed this Portrait of a Young Man may be compared in concept with Pontormo's 1534 Portrait of Alessandro de Medici, now in the John G. Johnson Collection, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia.1 Both portraits depict a young man at work (one drawing, the other writing) in an austere interior, the simplicity of which serves to focus our attention on the psychological state of the sitter. 

1. Inv. no. Cat 83, oil on panel, 39 7/8 by 32 1/4 in., https://philamuseum.org/collection/object/102656.