View full screen - View 1 of Lot 232. A girl slumbering under a tree in a landscape.
232

John Opie, R.A.

A girl slumbering under a tree in a landscape

Property from a Private Collection, California

John Opie, R.A.

John Opie, R.A.

A girl slumbering under a tree in a landscape

A girl slumbering under a tree in a landscape

Authenticity guarantee

What is guaranteed?

Property from a Private Collection, California

John Opie, R.A.

Cornwall 1761 - 1807 London

A girl slumbering under a tree in a landscape


oil on canvas

canvas: 50 by 40 in.; 127 by 101.6 cm.

framed: 64 by 54 in.; 162.6 by 137.2 cm.

The canvas has been lined and it is stable on its stretcher. The overall image reads strongly beneath a relatively clear varnish. Much of the artist's brilliant palette and loose, thick brushwork is retained, as visible in the foliage at upper left, in the folds of fabric along the figure's knees, and in the brushwork in the background at center right. Diagonal stretcher bar marks are faintly visible at all four corners. There is some inconsistency to the varnish in the darks of the foliage above the sitter, most clearly visible in raking light, and there is a pattern of craquelure visible throughout. Inspection under UV light reveals a thick varnish that fluoresces somewhat unevenly in areas. There are some thin and finely applied strokes of retouching attending to some of the craquelure in the flesh tones and costume of the figure. Some more concentrated but isolated areas of retouching to the craqeulure visible in the background to the left of the figure's hips, in the darks of the lower right corner, and in the aforementioned shadows of the foliage above the figure. There are some spots of more loosely applied strengthening in the shadows around the figure's lower body, in her hair and forehead, and possibly in some of the reds in the folds of her costume. Some other finely applied strokes of retouching scattered here and there in the background and foliage, including one spot near the center of the left edge. There may be an older campaign of restoration beneath, but this is difficult to discern under UV light. The painting can certainly hang in its present condition. Offered in a giltwood frame.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Anonymous sale, London, Bonham's, 4 July 2018, lot 101;
There acquired.
Possibly, London, Royal Academy, 1795, no. 124 (titled A Country Girl).

The artistic talents of John Opie, celebrated as the “Cornish Wonder,” were recognized at a young age. He arrived in London in 1781 and his dramatic and realistic style quickly left an impression on other artists in the city, including Joshua Reynolds, who likened the young Opie to “Caravaggio and Velasquez in one.” While scenes of country life such as the present engrossed the artist in his early years, he would go on to establish himself as one of the most prominent historical and portrait painters of his generation in London, and was highly respected among his fashionable clients, including members of the British Royal Family. After exhibiting many of his works at the Royal Academy in the early 1780s, Opie was elected RA in 1787 and Professor of Painting at the Royal Academy in 1805.