View full screen - View 1 of Lot 244. An archaic bronze ritual food vessel (Ding), Late Shang dynasty | 商末 青銅饕餮紋鼎.
244

An archaic bronze ritual food vessel (Ding), Late Shang dynasty | 商末 青銅饕餮紋鼎

Archaic Bronzes from the MacLean Collection

An archaic bronze ritual food vessel (Ding), Late Shang dynasty | 商末 青銅饕餮紋鼎

An archaic bronze ritual food vessel (Ding), Late Shang dynasty | 商末 青銅饕餮紋鼎

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An archaic bronze ritual food vessel (Ding)

Late Shang dynasty

商末 青銅饕餮紋鼎


the interior with a later inscription reading tianzi zuoyong baofuding X

後加銘文:

天子作用寶福鼎 □


Height 9⅛ in., 23.2 cm

One side of the body and the base with multiple restored breaks. The legs likely reattached. X-Ray images available upon request.


器身一側及底數處見損經修。足應經重接。X光片可供索取。


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In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.


我們很高興為您提供上述拍品狀況報告。由於敝公司非專業修復人員,在此敦促您徵詢其他專業修復人員,以獲得更詳盡、專業之報告。

準買家應該檢查每件拍品以確認其狀況,蘇富比所作的任何陳述均為主觀看法而非事實陳述。雖然本狀況報告或有針對某拍品之討論,但所有拍賣品均根據印於圖錄內之業務規則以拍賣時狀況出售。

Acquired in Hong Kong, 1994.


購於香港,1994年

Boldly decorated with a single frieze of large taotie masks, which covers the entire surface of its swelling body, this imposing ding is a classic example of the form and decoration that was popular during the late Shang period (c. 1600-1046 BC). The present bronze is distinctive for the inward orientation of the oversized horns, rising prominently above a ground of incised spirals. See two ding decorated with closely related taotie masks: the taller one with a five-character inscription, preserved in the Palace Museum, Beijing; and the other sold at Christie’s New York, 24th March 2011, lot 1234.


Ding were food containers and cooking utensils used for sacrificial ceremonies. Compare vessels of similar form and design, but cast with the more commonly found design of taotie with horizontally arranged horns, such as one illustrated in Robert W. Bagley, Shang Ritual Bronzes in the Arthur M. Sackler Collections, Washington, D.C., 1987, pl. 87, in which the author mentions a comparable vessel that was unearthed from a Yinxu burial, attributed by the excavators to the last quarter of the Anyang period (c. 1300-1046 BC). Compare also another ding preserved in the Shanghai Museum, Shanghai, illustrated in Ma Chengyuan ed., Zhongguo wenwu jinghua daquan: qingtong juan / The Quintessence of Chinese Cultural Relics: Bronzes, Hong Kong, 1994, p. 8, no. 26.