View full screen - View 1 of Lot 1518. Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Pole Screen, Carving attributed to the School of Henry Hardcastle, New York, New York, Circa 1750.
1518

Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Pole Screen, Carving attributed to the School of Henry Hardcastle, New York, New York, Circa 1750

Estimate:

40,000 - 60,000 USD

Property from an Important American Collection

Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Pole Screen, Carving attributed to the School of Henry Hardcastle, New York, New York, Circa 1750

Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Pole Screen, Carving attributed to the School of Henry Hardcastle, New York, New York, Circa 1750

Estimate:

40,000 - 60,000 USD

Lot sold:

44,100

USD

Authenticity guarantee

What is guaranteed?

Property from an Important American Collection

Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Pole Screen

Carving attributed to the School of Henry Hardcastle

New York, New York

Circa 1750


Retains original needlework. Finial replaced.

Height 59 5/8 in. by Width 18 1/2 in. by Depth 17 3/4 in.

In overall fine condition. Significant abrasion and wear to pole screen shaft.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

L.P. Goulding;

Joe Kindig, Jr. & Son, York, Pennsylvania;

Private collection.


Wallace Nutting, Furniture Treasury, (Cambridge, MA: The University Press, 1928), no. 1411.

American polescreens rarely come on the marketplace. With its exceptional lavish carved decoration, the present example represents the most richly embellished of its type and can be considered a masterpiece of the form. Its carving is attributed to the school of Henry Hardcastle (fl. ca. 1750-1756), the immigrant carver who was working in New York from circa 1750 to July 1755, after which time he moved to Charleston, South Carolina. A candlestand in a private collection with closely related carving of the same pattern appears to stem from the same shop.


Likely British-trained in the 1730s-1740s and admitted as a Freeman in New York in 1751, Hardcastle was commissioned by Frederick Philipse III, the third lord of Philipse Manor in Yonkers, New York, for all of the ornate architectural carving for his house.1 His bold and naturalistic carving displayed on the first and second floor chimneypieces was inspired by stone carving in British Palladian interiors of the 1720s-1740s.2 Elements of this carving are considered to be among the earliest manifestations of the Rococo style in America.


The attribution for this polescreen is based upon shared characteristics of its carving with that executed by Hardcastle for Philipse Manor.3 He was consistent in his work, typically executing leaves with similar profiles, veining flutes, and perpendicular crosscuts in the same context, and favoring use of the same tools. His shop was apparently small, with his only known apprentice being Stephen Dwight (w. 1755 to c. 1774), who ran away in June of 1755 and opened his own shop soon after. In addition to similarities with the carving for Philipse Manor, the carving on this polescreen also relates to carving on a chimneypiece at Hampton Place and a desk-and-bookcase with a history of descent in the Peter Stuyvesant family, both carved by craftsmen trained by Hardcastle.4 Through these craftsmen, Hardcastle's shop practice was influential and enduring in New York throughout the second-half of the eighteenth century.


For two additional New York mahogany polescreens, see one retaining its original oversize needlework panel with a similar standard, acanthus-carved knees and claw feet illustrated by Israel Sack Inc. and one with a bulbous standard and angular claw feet at Winterthur Museum.5


1 Luke Beckerdite, "Origins of the Rococo Style in New York Furniture and Interior Architecture," American Furniture 1993, pp. 233-265.

2 See ibid, fig. 1 and 2, p. 234.

3 For characteristics of Hardcastle's carving, see ibid, p. 237-45.

4 See ibid, figs. 6-11, pp. 236-9.

5 Israel Sack Inc., American Antiques from Israel Sack Collection, Volume IX, P5970, p. 2417 and Joseph Downs, American Furniture, Queen Anne and Chippendale Periods, New York, 1952, no. 241.