View full screen - View 1 of Lot 72. A George IV silver-gilt cup and cover, Edward Barnard & Sons, London, 1829.
72

A George IV silver-gilt cup and cover, Edward Barnard & Sons, London, 1829

A George IV silver-gilt cup and cover, Edward Barnard & Sons, London, 1829

A George IV silver-gilt cup and cover, Edward Barnard & Sons, London, 1829

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A George IV silver-gilt cup and cover, Edward Barnard & Sons, London, 1829


Vase form, the panelled sides embossed with hanging flowers, the neck, handles and finial with fruiting vines, the foot engraved with an inscription 'MONSIEUR JOSEPH D'AGUILAR SAMUDA CONSTRUCTEUR DU "PYTHEAS" ET DE "PROTIS" COMME MARQUE DE SATISFACTION ET D'AMITE 6 NOVEMBRE 1856'

43cm., 17in. high

3692gr., 118 ½oz.

Clear hallmarks. Rocks slightly on a flat surface and leans slightly to one side. Some minor wear to the gilding and minor surface dents and scratches.



The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

‘The announcement of the death [on 27 April 1885] of Mr. J.D. Samuda, J.P., the well-known shipbuilder of Millwall, and formerly Liberal member of Parliament for the Tower Hamlets, cast a gloom over Poplar and the surrounding district, on Tuesday evening. Mr. Samuda had been in imperfect health for some time. . . .
‘Mr. Samuda was the second, but only surviving, son of the late Mr. A. Samuda, an East and West India merchant, of South-street, Finsbury, by his marriage with Joy, daughter of the late Mr. H. D’Aguilar, of Enfield-chase, Middlesex. Mr. Samuda was born [on 21 May] 1813, and was a Commissioner of Lieutenancy for London, a Deputy-Lieutenant for the Tower Hamlets and a magistrate for Middlesex and Westminster. He became a civil engineer in 1832, was for many years a member of the Institute of Civil Engineers, and for some time a vice-president of the Institute of Naval Architects, and was formerly Lieut-Colonel of the 1st Tower Hamlets Rifle Volunteers.
‘In 1832 he entered into partnership with his brother Mr. Jacob Samuda, in the engineering business, which was chiefly for the first 10 years that of constructing marine engines. In 1843 they turned their attention to shipbuilding, and in the following years Mr. Jacob Samuda was killed in the bursting of the boiler of the Gipsy Queen, one of the first ships the firm had built. Since that time the firm has built many ships, including her Majesty's troopship Tamar [1863], her Majesty's ship Neptune [1874], her Majesty’s ship Belleisle [1876], her Majesty's ship Orion [1879], two ironclads for the Brazilian Government, and numbers for the merchant service. . . .
‘Mr. Samuda married, in 1837, Louisa, daughter of the late Mr. Samuel Ballin, of Holloway, Middlesex. The news of Mr. Samuda’s death has been received with great regret, not only by his old constituents, but by a large circle of friends and by the commercial world generally.’ (The East End Local Advertiser and Tower Hamlets Independent, London, Saturday, 2 May 1885, p. 7c)