View full screen - View 1 of Lot 31. Attributed to Muramba, active circa 1960.
31

Attributed to Muramba, active circa 1960

Attributed to Muramba, active circa 1960

Attributed to Muramba, active circa 1960

Authenticity guarantee

What is guaranteed?

Attributed to Muramba

Active circa 1960

The Rockman Nimbawah


Natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark

16 ½ in by 18 in (41.9 cm by 45.7 cm)

The bark is unframed with no hanging system. The bark itself is stable, un-warped and in a good condition. There is some minor fraying to the upper and lower edges and small areas of pigment loss, scuffs and rubbing and many small areas throughout the painting. All of which are visible in the catalogue illustration. The pigments overall look to be in a stable condition and, in the specialist's opinion, not in any need of consolidation. 


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Painted at Oenpelli (Gunbalanya), Western Arnhem Land
William McElwee Miller, Jr, Princeton
Sotheby's, Melbourne, Aboriginal Art, 24 November 2009, lot 20
Private Collection, acquired at the above auction
R. L. Shalkop, The Art of Arnhem Land: From the Collection of William McE. Miller, Jr, Colorado Springs, 1966, cat. no. 29
The Taylor Museum of the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, The Art of Arnhem Land: From the Collection of William McE. Miller, Jr, 1966
The Art of Arnhem Land exhibition catalogue states: "According to the myth, Nimbawah traveled with his two dogs, cutting his way through the hills. One day he reached a lagoon and met a pigeon-hawk. Nimbawah told him he was tired of life and was going to turn himself into a barramundi (a fish). After he did so, the lagoon began to rise so he turned himself into a rainbow, and still later into a large rock (shown in the painting) which the aborigines identify with one of the prominent landmarks in the Oenpelli area today."