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412

Rubens Santoro

Venetian Canal

Rubens Santoro

Rubens Santoro

Venetian Canal

Venetian Canal

Rubens Santoro

Italian

1859 - 1942

Venetian Canal


signed Rubens Santoro (lower right)

oil on canvas

canvas: 16½ by 13 in.; 41.9 by 33 cm

framed: 23¼ by 19¾ in.; 59 by 50.1 cm

The canvas is lined. The paint surface is stable and in good condition. There is slight frame abrasion on all four edges. Under UV light, a few small areas of retouching in the sky at right and to the right of the artist's signature.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

James Elverson, Jr
His sale: American Art Association, Anderson Galleries, 30 January 1930, lot 6
While Rubens Santoro is most often recognized for his depictions of the city’s most majestic structures on the Grand Canal, he sometimes turned a more intimate eye onto quieter streets and less-traveled waterways. These overlooked neighborhoods afforded him the opportunity to develop a new visual vocabulary of daily Venetian life: sheets drying in the breeze; open shudders; subtle earth tones of crumbling building plasters; humble gondolas; and passing pedestrians. This is the Venice of the Venetians, who live every day amongst the magic of the city—unseen by many, yet sensitively recorded by Santoro’s brush.

Santoro was a pupil of Domenico Morelli at the Academy of fine art in Naples. He exhibited in Naples, Turin, Venice, Rome and abroad including London and at the Salon des Artistes Français in Paris where he received an honorable mention in 1896. He specialized almost exclusively in quotidian scenes of Venice.