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8

Alice Bailly

Nu aux cheveux rouges

Estimate:

80,000 - 120,000 CHF

Alice Bailly

Alice Bailly

Nu aux cheveux rouges

Nu aux cheveux rouges

Estimate:

80,000 - 120,000 CHF

Alice Bailly

1872 - 1938

Nu aux cheveux rouges


Oil on canvas

Signed lower right;

signed on the reverse

95 x 100 cm (unframed); 119 x 123 cm (framed)

Executed circa 1912

This work is in good condition. The burlap canvas is slightly buckling and loose. There are hairlines craquelures throughout the painted surface. There are some areas with paint loss, especially along the edges and corners. Close inspection reveals scattered tiny pinholes across the painting, one clearly visible below the artist's signature. Inspection under UV light shows no sign of retouching.


Please note: Condition 16 of the Conditions of Business for Buyers (Online Only) is not applicable to this lot.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Sotheby's, Zurich, 5th December 1991, lot 111
Acquired from the above sale by the present owner

Lausanne, Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Alice Bailly, La fête étrange, 2005-2006, no. 41, pp. 36, 182, ill. 

Swiss artist Alice Bailly moved to Paris in 1906, at the age of 32. Through her contacts with the local art scene, she became aware of the avant-garde tendencies and experienced a strong desire for emancipation. By broadening her artistic horizons, Bailly gradually transformed her pictorial technique and created artworks that « would have sparked a scandal in Geneva » (a quote from the artist in her Livre de raison). Matisse, Braque and Derain particularly caught her attention, prompting her to change her approach to colour and experiment with audacious framing. Furthermore, the tortured art of Van Gogh and Cuno Amiet encouraged her towards formal and stylistic simplification, characteristic of expressionist and cubist creations.


The Nu aux cheveux rouges, executed circa 1912, reflects the diversity of Alice Bailly's influences of the time and is undoubtedly part of her most creative period. In this composition, the landscape is limited to an imbrication of shapes and colours, thus creating a harmonisation between the female figure and the background. In a complementary dialogue of forms, the landscape presents a cubic aspect, while the body displays round features. Although the colour palette is limited, the brightness of the hair is reminiscent of Fauve paintings.


One of the rare larger format works by Alice Bailly representing a human figure, the Nu aux cheveux rouges is at the crossroads of vanguards movements and is among the compositions that led the artist to find her personal signature. Painted the year when Apollinaire praised Bailly's talent at the Parisian Salon of 1912 and shortly before her first solo exhibition at the Athenée in Geneva, this work demonstrates the artist's ability to surpass Swiss painting's conventions and confirm her frank involvement in the international avant-garde.