View full screen - View 1 of Lot 28. A Tachi | Signed Zen Hakushu Nobutaka nyudo | Edo period, dated Kanbun jusannen (1673).
28

A Tachi | Signed Zen Hakushu Nobutaka nyudo | Edo period, dated Kanbun jusannen (1673)

The Property of an American Gentleman

A Tachi | Signed Zen Hakushu Nobutaka nyudo | Edo period, dated Kanbun jusannen (1673)

A Tachi | Signed Zen Hakushu Nobutaka nyudo | Edo period, dated Kanbun jusannen (1673)

The Property of an American Gentleman

A Tachi

Signed Zen Hakushu Nobutaka nyudo

Edo period, dated Kanbun jusannen (1673) 


Sugata [configuration]: shinogi-zukuri, shallow tori-zorisuguha bohi on both sides 

Kitae [forging pattern]: tight itame hada 

Hamon [tempering pattern]: Ko-nie with a wide suguha 

Boshi [tip]: Ko-maru with long kaeri 

Nakago [tang]: Iriyamagata with two mekugi-ana, signed Zen Hakushu Nobutaka nyudo and dated Seinen nanajuissai kore o tsukuru Kanbun jusannen hachigatsu hi (Made on a day in August 1673 at the age of 71)

Habaki [collar]: Gold

Nagasa [length from kissaki to machi]: 76.5 cm., 30⅛ in.  

Saki-haba [width at the yokote]: 2 cm., ¾ in. 

Moto-haba [width at the machi]: 2.8 cm., 1 in. 

The koshirae [mount]: 108 cm., 42 ½ in. 

the fine tachi koshirae of black lacquer with an exaggerated pointed kojiri, decorated with trailing maple leaves and cherry blossoms, the silver fittings with further maple and cherry, pierced with boar's-eye openings (inome bori), similarly decorated on the ashi and fuchi-kashira, the tsuka with green ito, the gold menuki chased and engraved with hana no en Genji komon, the iron mokko-gata tsuba is mumei, pierced with four boar's-eye openings, the large copper seppa-dai engraved with floral scrolls 

The koshirae with some very minor surface scratches and slight lifting to a few silver inlaid cherry blossoms. The silk brocade with slight wear to the gold thread.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Quincy Adams Shaw (1826-1908); thence by descent. 

The gold menuki refer to Under the Cherry Blossoms (Hana no en), the eighth chapter of Murasaki Shikobu's Heian period novel the Tale of Genji. These abstract symbols refer to different chapters comprising the narrative, with some taken on by daimyo as family crests (kamon). 


The collection of Quincy Adams Shaw's Japanese works of art included fine lacquerware such as writing boxes (suzuribako), inro, incense boxes (kogo), as well as textiles and metalwork, which he bequeathed to the Tokyo National Museum in 1909. The Boston business magnate's eclectic collection extended also to Italian Renaissance sculptures and the pastel and etching work of Jean François Millet, the legacy of which can be viewed in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where he donated many of these works.