View full screen - View 1 of Lot 47. An Uda School tanto | Attributed to Uda Kuniyoshi and with kinzogan [gold inlay] inscription | Unotsu Muromachi period, circa 1430, the koshirae 19th century.
47

An Uda School tanto | Attributed to Uda Kuniyoshi and with kinzogan [gold inlay] inscription | Unotsu Muromachi period, circa 1430, the koshirae 19th century

VAT reduced rate

Estimate:

10,000 - 15,000 GBP

The Property of an American Collector

An Uda School tanto | Attributed to Uda Kuniyoshi and with kinzogan [gold inlay] inscription | Unotsu Muromachi period, circa 1430, the koshirae 19th century

An Uda School tanto | Attributed to Uda Kuniyoshi and with kinzogan [gold inlay] inscription | Unotsu Muromachi period, circa 1430, the koshirae 19th century

Estimate:

10,000 - 15,000 GBP

Lot sold:

11,340

GBP

The Property of an American Collector

An Uda School tanto

Attributed to Uda Kuniyoshi and with kinzogan [gold inlay] inscription Unotsu

Muromachi period, circa 1430, the koshirae 19th century 


Sugata [configuration]: Slight uchizori

Kitae [forging pattern]: Masame-hada mixed with ko-itame, fine chikeinie-utsuri

Hamon [tempering pattern]: Suguba in ko-nie deki

Boshi [tip]: Long kaeri

Nakago [tang]: Ubu, mumei, and with kinzogan inscription Unotsu

Habaki [collar]: Silver

Koshirae [mount]: The fine issaku tanto koshirae decorated in gold, silver and red hiramaki-etakamaki-etogidashi-e and keuchi on a polished deep red ground with scattered autumn maple leaves, the rogin fittings chased, engraved and inlaid with cherry blossoms and their falling petals, the kojiri in the form of a stylised cloud, the fuchi signed Ikkin with kao, the kogai signed Ikkin, the ribbed black lacquer tsuka with copper-gilt roundel on the omote and rogin roundel on the ura representing the sun and the moon

Nagasa [length from kissaki to machi]: 22.1 cm., 8¼ in. 

Moto-haba [width at the machi]: 2 cm., ¾ in. 


The tanto accompanied by a certificate of registration as Hozon Token [Sword Worthy of Preservation], no. 380158 issued by the Nihon Bijutsu Token Hozon Kyokai [Society for the Preservation of the Japanese Art Sword], dated Heisei 20 (2008). 


The koshirae accompanied by a certificate of registration as Tokubetsu Hozon Tosogu [Sword Fitting Especially Worthy of Preserving], no. 2002703 issued by the Nihon Bijutsu Token Hozon Kyokai [Society for the Preservation of the Japanese Art Sword], dated Heisei 27 (2015). 

To request a Condition Report for this Lot, please contact Jon.Adjetey@sothebys.com.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Funada Ikkin (1812-1862) was among Goto Ichijo's five most highly regarded pupils, renowned for his skill in taka-nikubori [high-relief carving]. Following ten years of apprenticeship, Ichijo bestowed Funada a character from his own name, a practice reserved only for one's most promising students. Ikkin was famous for his katakiribori carvings and kosuki-bori technique, often employed in his depictions of plum trees.