View full screen - View 1 of Lot 54. A magnificent daisho koshirae | The daisho fuchi signed Kimura Kyuichiro shitaji, Yokoya Nobusada horu (the foundation work by Kimura Kyuichiro, engraved by Yokoya Nobusada); the kozuka and kogai of the sho signed Goto Mitsunobu and with kao | Edo period, 18th century.
54

A magnificent daisho koshirae | The daisho fuchi signed Kimura Kyuichiro shitaji, Yokoya Nobusada horu (the foundation work by Kimura Kyuichiro, engraved by Yokoya Nobusada); the kozuka and kogai of the sho signed Goto Mitsunobu and with kao | Edo period, 18th century

VAT reduced rate

Estimate:

150,000 - 180,000 GBP

A magnificent daisho koshirae | The daisho fuchi signed Kimura Kyuichiro shitaji, Yokoya Nobusada horu (the foundation work by Kimura Kyuichiro, engraved by Yokoya Nobusada); the kozuka and kogai of the sho signed Goto Mitsunobu and with kao | Edo period, 18th century

A magnificent daisho koshirae | The daisho fuchi signed Kimura Kyuichiro shitaji, Yokoya Nobusada horu (the foundation work by Kimura Kyuichiro, engraved by Yokoya Nobusada); the kozuka and kogai of the sho signed Goto Mitsunobu and with kao | Edo period, 18th century

Estimate:

150,000 - 180,000 GBP

Lot sold:

302,400

GBP

A magnificent daisho koshirae 

The daisho fuchi signed Kimura Kyuichiro shitaji, Yokoya Nobusada horu (the foundation

work by Kimura Kyuichiro, engraved by Yokoya Nobusada); the kozuka and kogai of the sho signed Goto Mitsunobu and with kao

Edo period, 18th century 


the fine daisho koshirae decorated overall with gold ita-zutsumi on a rich ishime ground, the handachi-style fittings elaborately chiseled, chased and engraved with maru ni chigaitakanoha mon [crossed falcon feathers within circle crests] among young flowing pines on a fine nanako ground, the koiguchi in gold ikakeji, the kashira with two hands held in unison in gold, carved in high relief, the daisho fuchi signed Kimura Kyuichiro shitaji, Yokoya Nobusada horu (the foundation work by Kimura Kyuichiro, engraved by Yokoya Nobusada), the kozuka and kogai of the sho signed Goto Mitsunobu and with kao the aoi-gatatsuba carved in taka-bori [relief] and similarly decorated in shakudo, pierced with boar's eye openings (inome-bori), the gold fukurin intricately chased, 96.6 cm., 38 in.; 67.4 cm., 26½ in. long overall

Saya [scabbard]: 74 cm., 29⅛ in.; 52.2 cm., 20½ in. 

Sori [curvature] : 5.1 cm., 2 in.; 3.5 cm., 1⅜ in. overall 

Saya sori [curvature of the scabbard]: 3 cm., 1⅛ in.; 2.2 cm., ⅞ in. 

Tsuka [handle]: 22.6 cm., 8⅞ in.; 15.2 cm., 6 in. 

Tsuka sori [curvature of the handle]: 0.5 cm., ¼ in.; 0.3 cm., ⅛ in. 


Accompanied by a certificate of registration as Tokubetsu Juyo Token [Especially Important Sword], no. 30201825 issued by the Nihon Bijutsu Token Hozon Kyokai [Society for the Preservation of the Japanese Art Sword], dated Heisei 30 (2018).

To request a Condition Report for this Lot, please contact Jon.Adjetey@sothebys.com.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

The practice of wearing a daisho, the combination of an uchigatana and wakizashi, is thought to have emerged at the end of the Muromachi period (1336-1573). The formalised accoutrement of the daisho-koshirae presumably came into existence during the Edo period, with daimyo attendance to castles required what was earlier called kamishimozashi or banzashi. The official code of the Bakugi sanko defines such formal daisho-koshirae as having polished black lacquer scabbard, with the end of the katana straight and the wakizashi round, the hilts would be wrapped hishimaki-style in black braid, the kashira in black-lacquered horn, and the fuchi of shakudo consisting of either a nanako or polished finish. The tsuba was proposedly Kenjo in polished shakudo and the mitokoromono of first-class Goto school fittings. The only overtly decorative elements would be the family crests. Apart from the above mentioned official use however, daisho-koshirae were not regulated by the bakufu and several interpretations emerged based on the banzashi regulations.

These mounts are of the handachi-koshirae style which combines tachi fittings and a tachi-tsuba with uchigatana fittings like a kurigata and origane. The fittings are en suite decorated with young pines and crossed hawk feathers in circular

crests, with the daisho-fuchi bearing the signature of Yokoya Nobusada. Nobusada was the nyudo-go (art name taken with entering priesthood) of Katsura Eiju who worked for the Arima family, the daimyo of the Kurume fief.