View full screen - View 1 of Lot 106. Crucifixion with the Virgin and Saint John the Evangelist    .
106

Roberto d'Oderisio

Crucifixion with the Virgin and Saint John the Evangelist

Estimate:

400,000

to
- 600,000 USD

Roberto d'Oderisio

Roberto d'Oderisio

Crucifixion with the Virgin and Saint John the Evangelist

Crucifixion with the Virgin and Saint John the Evangelist

Estimate:

400,000

to
- 600,000 USD

Lot sold:

403,200

USD

Roberto d'Oderisio

Naples, circa 1330-1382

Crucifixion with the Virgin and Saint John the Evangelist


tempera and gold ground on panel

panel: 15 ⅞ by 11 ¼ in.; 40.3 by 28.6 cm. 

The following condition report has been provided by Matt Hayes of Pietro Edwards Society of Art Conservation, 336 West 37th Street, Suite 1580, New York, NY 10018, 212-457-8956, mh@edwards-society.com, an independent restorer who is not an employee of Sotheby's.


This painting is well preserved for a work of this early date, especially in the important flesh

passages. There are occasional lacunae scattered throughout, most of which have been retouched; this

retouching has slightly darkened. A sign of earlier devotional use, probably a burn from a candle, can

be seen to the left of the figure of St. John. The gilding is generally intact, though worn in parts to

reveal the red bole below. The mordant-gilt decoration of the garments is in very good state. There

are scattered traces of an old coating over the surface. A clear, relatively recent varnish lends the

painting a moderate gloss.


The thin panel preserves its full thickness and original format. The paint film has kept the

barbe of raised gesso at its edges, beyond which the unpainted wood remains to which an engaged

frame was once attached; gesso and painting, probably original, are present on the reverse. The lower

edge shows small losses to the wood. Worm damage is evident on the back, but there is no active

infestation. A hairline crack at the lower edge extends about 3 cm into the picture, along which a few

minute losses are present; this does not represent a serious threat to the object under normal

conditions, though the paint might be consolidated in this area.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

With Agnew’s, London;
With Wildenstein, London, by 1950 (according to an annotation in the Berenson archive, as Luca di Tomme);
From whom acquired by Denys Sutton, 1965;
Thence by descent in the family;
By whom sold, New York, Christie’s, 26 January 2005, lot 6 (as Francesco di Giotto);
There acquired.
S. Melikian, “Pricing the Old Masters,” International Herald Tribune, Feb 5-6 2005, p. 9, reproduced.
London, Wildenstein, The Art of Painting in Florence and Siena from 1250-1500, 25 February - 10 April 1965, no. 92 (as Luca di Tomme);
New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, September - December 2006, on loan.