View full screen - View 1 of Lot 13. Seated child eating a waffle.
13

French, circa 1560, Circle of Germain Pilon (1525-1590)

Seated child eating a waffle

VAT reduced rate

Estimate:

30,000

to
- 50,000 EUR

French, circa 1560, Circle of Germain Pilon (1525-1590)

French, circa 1560, Circle of Germain Pilon (1525-1590)

Seated child eating a waffle

Seated child eating a waffle

Estimate:

30,000

to
- 50,000 EUR

French, circa 1560, Circle of Germain Pilon (1525-1590)

Seated child eating a waffle


polychromed terracotta

21,5 x 16 x 14,5 cm ; 8⅓ by 6⅓ by 5½ in.

__________________________________________________________________________


France, vers 1560, Entourage de Germain Pilon (1525-1590)

Enfant dégustant une gaufre


terre cuite polychrome

21,5 x 16 x 14,5 cm ; 8⅓ by 6⅓ by 5½ in.

The polychrome terracotta is in very good condition overall. There are a few minor losses to the edges of the collar and proper right sleeve, as well as to the seam of her dress. The polychromy appears to have been refreshed. To effect the thermolumniscence analysis, one fine hole was drilled behind the girl's proper right ear, another hole to her proper right hand. There are two further drilling holes to the underside of the terracotta to the inside of the sculpture. A very rare and exceptional piece. The result of the thermolumniscence made by Oxford Authentification is available on request.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Related Literature

G. Bresc Bautier (dir.), J. Thirion, « La représentation de l'enfance dans l'œuvre de Germain Pilon et dans la sculpture de son temps », in Germain Pilon et les sculpteurs français de la Renaissance, Musée du Louvre, Paris, 1990, pp. 113-129.

E. Coyecque, « Au domicile mortuaire de Germain Pilon », Humanisme et Renaissance, Paris, t. VII, 1904, pp. 45-101.

__________________________________________________________________________


Références bibliographiques

G. Bresc Bautier (dir.), J. Thirion, « La représentation de l'enfance dans l'œuvre de Germain Pilon et dans la sculpture de son temps », dans Germain Pilon et les sculpteurs français de la Renaissance, Musée du Louvre, Paris, 1990, pp. 113-129.

E. Coyecque, « Au domicile mortuaire de Germain Pilon », Humanisme et Renaissance, Paris, t. VII, 1904, pp. 45-101.

Sculpted portrait busts in polychrome terracotta, widespread in Italy from the fifteenth century, developed in the rest of Europe from the mid-sixteenth century onwards, most notably in the Netherlands, England and France. The fragility of these works, the scarcity of available documentation, together with the fact that a large number of these terracotta have now disappeared, make the question of their origin a complex issue. In 1990, the Louvre organized a symposium on Germain Pilon and his contemporaries that resulted in a synthesis of the extensive research that had been carried out on the French sculpture of the second half of the sixteenth century, and more specifically, on the representation of children (G. Bresc-Bautier, op. cit). First depicted in the iconography of the Virgin with Child, funerary personifications, and allegorical and mythological subjects such as Charity, and Venus and Love, the figure of the child became a theme in its own right in France in the mid-sixteenth century.


A few rare examples of busts of children in polychrome terracotta are known. They are all characterized by a sharp sense of anatomical realism, as well as the sculptor’s skills in rendering the facial expressions typical of children. The representation of the youthful nature of these portraits is highlighted by the polychromy that renders–like a painted portrait in three dimensions–the pink hue of the cheeks and lips and the freshness of the flesh that is unique to children. A Buste de fillette (Portrait Bust of a Young Girl) in polychrome terracotta at the Louvre Museum, today considered to have originated in France, late sixteenth century, has been attributed to the Besançon sculptor Claude Arnoux, known as Lullier, and is similar to the work produced by Germain Pilon and his studio (Height: 23 cm/9.06 in., inv. no. R.F. 1646). The attribution to Lullier was based on similarities with two children’s busts he produced, now in the museum of Besançon (inv. no. D.863.3.22 and D.863.3.21). Compare also another Portrait Bust of a Young Girl with clothes and a hairstyle conforming to the customs of the time–even though the modelling is somewhat stiffer–conserved in the Pierpoint Morgan Library and Museum (as originating in Franche-Comté, France or the Netherlands, mid-sixteenth century, inv. no. AZ056). A last bust in polychrome terracotta, the Portrait d’Henri III enfant (Portrait of Henri III as a child), is today attributed to Germain Pilon and his studio (Bode Museum, Berlin). It should be noted that Raphaël Pilon, son and collaborator of the sculptor, continued the practice of children’s portraits in his own studio on Rue Saint Martin. A contract that Raphaël established in 1585 for the portrait busts of a master stonemason and a young girl requires the sculptor to “ensure that the figure is a good resemblance … right down to the belt, and to decorate said figures with paint and flesh in accordance with nature.” (J. Thirion, op. cit, p. 127).


Along with the Fillette assise holding a cup (sold Sotheby’s, 28 november 2017), our terracotta is the only mentioned full length portrait of a child, and not a bust. Although no other comparable full-length terracotta figures seem to have survived, the existence of such works is mentioned in contemporary documents. The posthumous inventory of Pilon’s studio drawn up in February 1590 with the help of the sculptor Martin Lefort, notes many polychrome portraits–including those of François I, Henri II, the Queen of Navarre and Constable of France Anne de Montmorency–and mentions several figures of children that are both “painted and clothed”. The term figure (figure), used as distinct from that of tête (head) indeed to designate representations of dressed children in full length, the flesh, eyes and hair painted quite naturally (au naturel). The precise descriptions in the inventory throw light on this little-known facet of the work of Pilon and his studio. Thus "Deux figures d’enfants au naturel, peints et étoffés, 4 écus" (Two figures of children painted and clothed, 4 ecus) are mentioned in the home of the sculptor (E. Coyecques, op. cit. p. 50). Further on, "Deux petits enfants assis sur un matelas et qui se mordent le doigt, 3 écus" (Two small children seated on a mattress, biting their fingers, 3 ecus) are mentioned, followed by "Cinq têtes d’enfants dont une étoffée, 30 s." (Five heads of children, including one that is clothed, 30 sols) (ibidem, p. 55).


The face of our young boy eating a waffle epitomises the stylistic characteristics distinctive of this type of portrait. The almond-shaped eyes, their outer corners rising, the eyelids in relief, the wide forehead whose pronounced curve is typical of the anatomy of a child, the high hairline with the wavy hair, and lastly, the high, finely-drawn eyebrows are all noteworthy. A similar physiognomy is found in the marble Buste d’enfant (Portrait Bust of Child) at the Louvre. Although the attribution is unconfirmed by any documentation, the artist is universally agreed to be Pilon (in. no. N 15158).

__________________________________________________________________________


Les portraits en terre cuite polychrome, répandues en Italie dès le XVe siècle, se développent en Europe à partir du milieu du XVIe siècle, notamment aux Pays-Bas, en Angleterre et en France. La similitude de ces productions, le peu de documentation disponible et le fait qu’un grand nombre de ces terres cuites aient depuis disparu, complexifient la question de leur origine. En 1990, le colloque sur Germain Pilon et ses contemporains organisé par le musée du Louvre permit de faire la synthèse des vastes travaux qui avaient été menés sur la statuaire française de la seconde moitié du XVIe siècle et, plus précisément, sur la représentation de l’enfance. Influencée par l’iconographie des Vierges à l’Enfant, des génies funéraires ou des sujets allégoriques et mythologiques tels que la Charité ou Vénus et l’Amour, la figure enfantine devient progressivement un thème autonome en France à partir du milieu du XVIe siècle.


Quelques rares exemplaires de bustes d’enfants en terre cuite polychrome sont connus. Ils se distinguent tous par un sens aigu du réalisme anatomique et une capacité des sculpteurs à retranscrire les mimiques propres à l’enfance. La représentation du caractère juvénile de ces portraits est soulignée par la polychromie restituant le rosé des joues et des lèvres ou la fraîcheur des carnations propres à l’enfance. Un Buste de fillette en terre cuite polychrome du musée du Louvre, aujourd’hui donné comme France, fin du XVIe siècle, fut souvent attribué au sculpteur de Besançon Claude Arnoux, dit Lullier, et rapproché de l’œuvre de Germain Pilon et de son atelier (inv. n° R.F. 1646). Un buste en terre cuite polychrome, représentant le Portrait d’Henri III enfant, est aujourd’hui attribué à Germain Pilon et son atelier (Bode Museum, Berlin). Notons que Raphaël, fils et collaborateur de Pilon, fit perdurer la pratique des portraits d’enfants dans son propre atelier, rue Saint Martin.


L’inventaire après décès de l’atelier de Germain Pilon, dressé en février 1590 avec le concours du sculpteur Martin Lefort, fait état de nombreux portraits polychromes - dont ceux de François Ier, Henri II, ou du connétable Anne de Montmorency - incluant plusieurs figures d’enfants « peints et étoffés ». Le terme « figure », employé de manière distincte de celui de « tête », semble bien désigner des représentations d’enfants vêtus et en pied, aux carnations, cheveux et yeux peints à l'imitation du réel (« au naturel »). Les descriptions précises de l’inventaire éclairent ce pan méconnu de l’œuvre de Pilon et de son atelier. Ainsi est-il fait mention dans la maison du sculpteur de « Deux figures d’enfants au naturel, peints et étoffés, 4 écus » (E. Coyecques, op. cit. p. 50). Un peu plus loin sont consignés à nouveau « Deux petits enfants assis sur un matelas et qui se mordent le doigt, 3 écus » suivis de « cinq têtes d’enfants dont une étoffée, 30 s. » (ibidem, p. 55).


Avec la Fillette assise tenant une écuelle, proposée sur le marché il y a quelques années (Sotheby’s, 28 novembre 2017), notre terre cuite est la seule à notre connaissance à présenter la particularité de figurer l’enfant en totalité, et non seulement en buste. Le visage de notre Garçon mangeant une gaufre est un condensé des caractéristiques stylistiques propres à cette typologie de portraits. Notons ainsi ses yeux en amandes aux commissures ascendantes et aux paupières en relief, le large front dont le bombé prononcé est typique d’une anatomie juvénile, l’implantation haute de la chevelure formée de sillons ondulants, enfin les sourcils hauts placés et finement dessinés. Nous retrouvons une morphologie comparable dans le Buste d’enfant en marbre du Louvre dont l’attribution à Pilon, bien qu’aucun document ne vienne le confirmer, est reconnue de tous (inv. n° N 15158).