View full screen - View 1 of Lot 60. Angels Bearing the Column of the Passion | Les Anges portant la Colonne de la Passion.
60

Simon Vouet

Angels Bearing the Column of the Passion | Les Anges portant la Colonne de la Passion

Estimate:

200,000 - 300,000 EUR

From a French Private Collection | Provenant d'une collection particulière française

Simon Vouet

Simon Vouet

Angels Bearing the Column of the Passion | Les Anges portant la Colonne de la Passion

Angels Bearing the Column of the Passion | Les Anges portant la Colonne de la Passion

Estimate:

200,000 - 300,000 EUR

Lot sold:

252,000

EUR

Simon Vouet

Paris 1590 - 1649

Angels Bearing the Column of the Passion


Oil on canvas

130 x 79,9 cm ; 51⅛ by 31½ in.

___________________________________________


Simon Vouet

Paris 1590 - 1649

Les Anges portant la Colonne de la Passion


Huile sur toile

130 x 79,9 cm ; 51⅛ by 31½ in.

To request a Condition Report for this Lot, please contact clemence.enriquez@sothebys.com


Please note: Condition XVI of the Conditions of Business for Buyers (Online Only) is not applicable to this lot. (Veuillez noter que l'Article XVI des Conditions Générales de Vente applicables aux Vendeurs (Ventes Effectuées Exclusivement en Ligne) n'est pas applicable pour ce lot.)


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Anonymous sale, Paris, Drouot, 8 November 2006;

Where acquired by the present owner.

___________________________________________


Vente anonyme, Paris, Drouot, 8 novembre 2006 ;

Où acquis par l'actuel propriétaire.

D. Rykner, « Un fragment d’un grand modello de Vouet réapparaît à Drouot », La Tribune de l'Art, 8 novembre 2006.

Charles Mellin, un romain entre Rome et Naples, cat. exh. Caen – Nancy, 2007, pp. 42-43;

Simon Vouet (les années italiennes 1613-1627), cat. exh, Nantes - Besançon, 2008-2009, pp. 152-157, no.41a;

P. Malgouyre, « Charles Mellin et Simon Vouet en Italie », dans Simon Vouet en Italie, Rennes, 2011, pp. 69-84;

V. Farina, « Remarques sur le voyage génois de Simon, Vouet », dans ibid., pp. 104-105, fig. 13.

___________________________________________


D. Rykner, « Un fragment d’un grand modello de Vouet réapparaît à Drouot », La Tribune de l'Art, 8 novembre 2006.

Charles Mellin, un romain entre Rome et Naples, cat. exp. Caen – Nancy, 2007, pp. 42-43 ;

 Simon Vouet (les années italiennes 1613-1627), cat. exp, Nantes – Besançon, 2008-2009, pp. 152-157, n° 41a ;

P. Malgouyre, « Charles Mellin et Simon Vouet en Italie », dans Simon Vouet en Italie, Rennes, 2011, pp. 69-84 ;

V. Farina, « Remarques sur le voyage génois de Simon, Vouet », dans ibid., pp. 104-105, fig. 13.

Nantes – Besançon, Simon Vouet (les années italiennes 1613-1627), 21 novembre 2008 - 29 juin 2009, n° 41a.

This element from Simon Vouet’s most important Italian commission attests to a decorative scheme in St Peter’s in Rome which is now lost. It encapsulates the artist’s talent, his mastery of technique, his originality and the maturity he acquired from exposure to the Italian masters.


Simon Vouet was unquestionably the most important French painter in the first third of the seventeenth century. He settled in Rome in 1614 and rapidly became one of the most influential painters there, with a number of his compatriots following in his wake. He soon started receiving some of the most prestigious commissions offered in the Eternal City. His considerable fame made him the leading figure of the French school, and in 1627 this led to him being recalled to France by Louis XIII.


During his time in Rome, Simon Vouet received many commissions, but the most important was for St Peter’s Basilica. In 1624, the Fabric of St Peter commissioned Vouet to paint a monumental retable for the altar in the recently renovated canons’ chapel. However, this chapel had housed Michelangelo’s Piéta from 1568 to 1609 and the canons were demanding its return. Urban VIII agreed to their request and instead of an altarpiece, Vouet was now asked to provide frescoed decoration to complement the famous sculpture. This decoration, covering a surface of twenty-five square metres, was probably completed by early 1626 (J. Thuillier, catalogue of the exhibition Vouet, Paris, 1990-1991, p. 104) but has now disappeared.


In preparation for his work, Vouet created a bozzetto (55.8 x 63.5 cm) which is now in a private collection (fig.1), as well as a half-size model which was subsequently cut up: four pieces are known, including the present painting. The other three surviving elements from this large model are two groups of angels from the upper part of the composition (each 40.6 x 61.6 cm, fig. 2-3), now in the Los Angeles County Museum (M2000.179.1-2), and the present painting’s pendant, which shares its measurements (fig. 4), in the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Besançon (inv. 896.1.140).


In 2011, Philippe Malgouyre ventured the theory that the bozzetto had been submitted to the canons who had perhaps removed St Francis and St Anthony of Padua from the lower part of the composition. He added that an alternative possibility was that Simon Vouet only produced a sketch of the top part of the composition. He also questioned the purpose of this large dismantled painting, which includes the present piece: perhaps it was a trial to see what its effect would be in situ. In any event it seems probable, given the delays that had occurred, that Vouet would have had to delegate the painting of the fresco and that this finished modello, close to the final work, would have facilitated the work of his collaborators. Since the fresco has disappeared, these questions must remain open.


In 2008, Eric Schleier recalled the discoveries that had enabled a reconstruction of Simon Vouet’s most important Italian commission (exhibition catalogue Simon Vouet (les années italiennes 1613-1627), Nantes – Besançon, p. 152-157, no. 40-41c). The bozzetto, which arrived in England at the turn of the eighteenth century, wrongly attributed to Lanfranco, was identified by Sir Denis Mahon who drew it to Eric Schleier’s attention in the 1960s. From this small painting, it became possible to identify the major fragments of the large modello, including the present painting.


There are some notable differences between the present painting and the bozzetto, bearing witness to the evolution of Vouet’s creative process. The left wing of the nude angel at the top, carrying the column, is in a different position, revealing the face of the third angel, and the blue drapery has also changed. Additionally, the artist has altered the movement and position of the legs belonging to the angel at the bottom and consequently there is also a change to the movement and position of the drapery, which is burgundy in the present painting but blue in the little sketch. 


Jacques Thuillier describes the composition as a whole as one of the first great achievements of the art that is generally known as ‘Baroque’ (J. Thuillier, Propos sur La Tour, Le Nain, Poussin, Le Brun, Paris, 1991). In Eric Schleier’s view, Vouet’s inspiration came from Lanfranco’s fresco on the cupola of the Buongiovanni Chapel in the church of Sant’Agostino in Rome (1615-1616), but ‘the fragments of the modello have an originality and inventiveness all their own, in the daring foreshortening, the tormented poses of the bodies and the lively movement’ (op. cit., p. 152, our translation).


___________________________________________________


Elément de l’œuvre la plus importante commandée à Simon Vouet en Italie et témoignage d’un décor perdu de Saint Pierre de Rome, cette œuvre donne à voir tout le talent de l’artiste, sa maîtrise technique, la maturité acquise au contact des œuvres des maîtres italiens et sa singularité.


Simon Vouet est, incontestablement, le peintre français le plus important du premier tiers du XVIIe siècle. Installé à Rome dès 1614, il y devient rapidement l’un des peintres les plus influents, attirant dans son sillage nombre de ses compatriotes et recevant bientôt des commandes parmi les plus prestigieuses de la Ville Eternelle. Cette notoriété considérable fera de lui le chef de file de l’école française, au point d’être rappelé en France par Louis XIII en 1627.


Si lors de son séjour romain, Simon Vouet reçut de nombreuses commandes, la plus notable fut celle pour la basilique Saint Pierre. En 1624, la fabrique de Saint Pierre commande en effet à Vouet un retable monumental pour le placer sur l’autel de la chapelle des chanoines récemment rénovée. Cette chapelle avait abrité La Piéta de Michel-Ange de 1568 à 1609 et les chanoines réclamaient que la sculpture retrouve sa place. Urbain VIII accéda à leur requête et l’on commanda à Vouet à la place du retable un décor en fresque pour accompagner la célèbre sculpture. Ce décor, d’une surface de vingt-cinq mètres carrés, a probablement été achevé au début de l’année 1626 (J. Thuillier, catalogue de l’exposition Vouet, Paris, 1990-1991, p. 104) mais est aujourd’hui disparu.


Pour préparer ce décor Vouet réalisa un bozzetto (55,8 x 63,5 cm) conservé dans une collection particulière (fig.1), ainsi qu’un modèle à demi-grandeur découpé ultérieurement et dont on connaît à ce jour quatre parties dont notre tableau. Les autres parties de ce grand modèle sont conservées au Los Angeles County Museum (M2000.179.1-2) pour les deux groupes d’anges du haut de la composition (40.6 x 61.6 cm chacun) (fig. 2-3) et au Musée des Beaux-Arts de Besançon (inv. 896.1.140) pour le pendant, de dimensions équivalentes, de notre tableau (fig. 4).


Philippe Malgouyre, en 2011, émettait l’hypothèse que le bozzetto avait été soumis aux chanoines qui avaient peut-être supprimé du bas de la composition saint François et saint Antoine de Padoue. Il ajoute qu’une autre possibilité serait que Simon Vouet aurait réalisé une esquisse seulement pour le haut de la composition. Enfin, il pose la question de la fonction de ce grand tableau démantelé dont faisait partie notre tableau, peut-être a-t-il servi à faire un essai in situ pour juger de l’effet. Il semble en tout cas probable, étant donné les délais, que Vouet ait dû déléguer la réalisation de la fresque et ait, en conséquence, réalisé ce modello abouti et proche de l’œuvre finale pour faciliter le travail de ses collaborateurs. La fresque ayant disparu ces questions resteront en suspens.


Eric Schleier rappelait en 2008 (catalogue de l’exposition Simon Vouet (les années italiennes 1613-1627), Nantes – Besançon, pp. 152-157, n° 40-41c), les découvertes qui ont permis de reconstituer ce qui fut la plus importante commande faite à Simon Vouet lors de son séjour en Italie. Le bozzetto, arrivé en Angleterre au tournant du XVIIIe siècle et attribué à tort à Lanfranco fut identifié par Sir Denis Mahon qui le signala à Eric Schleier dans les années 1960. C’est à partir de ce petit tableau qu’ont pu être identifiés les fragments importants du grand modello dont notre tableau fait partie.


Quelques différences sont notables entre notre tableau et le bozzetto témoignant de l’évolution de Vouet dans son processus de création. L'aile gauche de l'ange nu du haut qui porte la colonne est dans une autre position, découvrant le visage du troisième ange, et le drapé bleu a changé. L’artiste a également transformé le mouvement et la position des jambes de l'ange du bas et, par conséquent, ceux du drapé, de couleur lie-de-vin dans notre tableau alors qu’il est peint en bleu dans la petite esquisse.


Jacques Thuillier qualifie la composition dans son ensemble comme une des premières grandes réalisations de ce qu’on appelle communément « l’art baroque » (J. Thuillier, Propos sur La Tour, Le Nain, Poussin, Le Brun, Paris, 1991). Pour Eric Schleier, c'est dans la fresque de Lanfranco, sur la coupole de la chapelle Bongiovanni de San Agostino (1615-1616) à Rome, que Vouet trouve son inspiration mais « les fragments du modello possèdent une originalité et une inventivité qui leur sont propres, de par la hardiesse du raccourci, les poses tourmentées des corps et la vivacité du mouvement » (op. cit., p. 152).



Fig. 1 Simon Vouet, Glorification de la Croix, esquisse (collection particulière).


Fig. 2 et 3 Simon Vouet, Etudes pour un retable © The Ciechanowiecki Collection, Gift of The Ahmanson Foundation, Los Angeles County Museum (inv. M2000.179.1-2).


Fig. 4 Simon Vouet, Anges portant les instruments de la Passion © Charles Choffet, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Besançon (inv. M0332000867).