View full screen - View 1 of Lot 136. Portrait of the Hon. Thomas Coke (1674-1727) of Melbourne Hall, bust-length.
136

Michael Dahl

Portrait of the Hon. Thomas Coke (1674-1727) of Melbourne Hall, bust-length

Estimate:

6,000

to
- 8,000 GBP

Property of Lord Ralph Kerr

Michael Dahl

Michael Dahl

Portrait of the Hon. Thomas Coke (1674-1727) of Melbourne Hall, bust-length

Portrait of the Hon. Thomas Coke (1674-1727) of Melbourne Hall, bust-length

Estimate:

6,000

to
- 8,000 GBP

Property of Lord Ralph Kerr

Michael Dahl

Stockholm circa 1659 - 1743 London

Portrait of the Hon. Thomas Coke (1674-1727) of Melbourne Hall, bust-length


oil on canvas, in a half painted oval, the top corners added

unframed: 76.2 x 63 cm.; 30 x 24 3/4 in.

framed: 95.5 x 83.4 cm.; 37 5/8 x 32 7/8 in.

The canvas is lined, and the painting is relatively clean with a clear varnish. The corners have been made up, which is visible to the naked eye under raking light. Inspection under ultraviolet light reveals a thick and uneven varnish underneath which some retouching is revealed: along the edges of the oval where the corners have been made up; small spots scattered in his cravat and a handful in his forehead and by his nose; some small areas along the lower edge and in the lowest part of his drapery; and a more concentrated spot upper right. In overall good condition.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

The family of, or commissioned by, Sir Thomas Coke (1675-1727), and thence by descent;
Admiral Lord Walter Talbot Kerr, Melbourne Hall, by 1927;
Thence by descent.
Fox, Pictures at Melbourne Hall [ref.168-23 Melbourne Archive] 1841, possibly the work described in the Hall as, ‘no.1, Vice Chamberlain Coke’;
Anon, Inventory of Furniture and Effects at Melbourne Hall, [ref.168-13-3 Melbourne Archive] 25 March 1858, possibly the work described in the Drawing Room as, ‘no.28, Mr Thomas Coke’;
Anon, Inventory of Fixtures, Furniture, Books, Pictures, Tools, etc., [ref.168-9 Melbourne Archive] 12 July 1897, possibly the work described in the Morning Room as, ‘no.56, Sir Thomas Coke by Lely [sic]’;
W. Nisser, Michael Dahl and the Contemporary Swedish School of Painting in England, London 1927, p. 14, cat. no. 44c (dated circa 1700-20).

 

Thomas Coke was a courtier and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1698 and 1715. Although a Tory on paper, he was prepared to support the Whigs in order to keep hold of his public offices. He obtained a court place as Vice-Chamberlain in the Royal Household in 1706 and held the position until his death in 1727. 


When Coke came into possession of Melbourne Hall he altered and extended the house and he is credited with creating the gardens there. He was one of the original backers of the Royal Academy of Music, establishing a London opera company which commissioned numerous works from George Frideric Handel, Giovanni Bononcini and others. Coke married twice - firstly in around June 1698 to Lady Mary Stanhope, daughter of Philip Earl of Chesterfield, by whom he had two daughters; secondly on 15 October 1709 to Elizabeth Hales, daughter of Richard Hales of King's Walden, Hertfordshire, one of the Maids of Honour to Queen Anne, by whom he had a daughter and a son. He left most of the estate to his son George Lewis Coke (1715–1751).