View full screen - View 1 of Lot 3513. A gilt-bronze figure of Avalokiteshvara Tang dynasty | 唐 鎏金銅觀世音菩薩立像.
3513

A gilt-bronze figure of Avalokiteshvara Tang dynasty | 唐 鎏金銅觀世音菩薩立像

Estimate:

1,000,000

to
- 1,500,000 HKD

A gilt-bronze figure of Avalokiteshvara Tang dynasty | 唐 鎏金銅觀世音菩薩立像

A gilt-bronze figure of Avalokiteshvara Tang dynasty | 唐 鎏金銅觀世音菩薩立像

Estimate:

1,000,000

to
- 1,500,000 HKD

A gilt-bronze figure of Avalokiteshvara

Tang dynasty

唐 鎏金銅觀世音菩薩立像


finely cast in the form of the Bodhisattva standing in tribhanga atop a waisted lotus pedestal and stepped hexagonal base, all above a rectangular pedestal, the plump face and sidelong glance bearing a serene yet curious expression, the body adorned in a closely fitting dhoti, flaunting the curving form of the deity’s torso, achieving an almost dancelike movement, fluttering scarves outlining her swayed-hip posture, the right hand in an elevated position, the left hand holding a kundika

h. 18 cm

Good overall condition with just minor losses including the tips of the robes and two cracks to the left scarf, including a 0.2cm loss. There is typical oxidisation and rubbing to the gilding, and other general surface wear.



The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Sotheby's New York, 22nd September 2004, lot 7.


紐約蘇富比2004年9月22日,編號7

Leopold Swergold, Thoughts on Chinese Buddhist Gilt Bronzes, Aventura, 2014, cat. no. 20.


Leopold Swergold,《Thoughts on Chinese Buddhist Gilt Bronzes》,2014年,圖版20

Reflection and Enlightenment: Chinese Buddhist Gilt Bronzes from the Jane and Leopold Swergold Collection, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, 2017-2018. 


《Reflection and Enlightenment: Chinese Buddhist Gilt Bronzes from the Jane and Leopold Swergold Collection》,休士頓美術館,休士頓,2017-2018年

This elegant bodhisattva, depicted standing in tribhanga on a waisted lotus pedestal and stepped hexagonal base, is adorned in a long dhoti and fluttering scarves. The kundika in the left hand, and the willow branch in the right, identify the figure as the Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara. The contours of the slender body are well defined in the contrapposto silhouette and the wet-drapery effect of the clothing, all of which are characteristic of Buddhist sculpture in the high Tang dynasty. The curving form of the deity’s torso achieves an almost dancelike movement. This highly recognizable stylistic element of the swayed-hip posture became especially popular during the reign of Emperor Xuanzong (712-756), when sculptures in general became more dynamic in their design.


Compare a similar bodhisattva image, with relatively large head and similar treatment of the robes, in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, illustrated by Ulrich von Schroeder, Indo-Tibetan Bronzes, Hong Kong, 1981, p. 501, fig. 142F. For a similar figure of Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara standing atop a hexagonal base, see the Harvard Art Museums Buddhism and Early East Asian Buddhist Art exhibition, bequest of Grenville L. Winthrop, object number 1943.53.61.


A closely related figure, with hexagonal, rather than square, base and an inscription dated to AD 651, formerly in the Stoclet and Swergold collections, is illustrated in Osvald Siren, Chinese Sculpture from the Fifth to Fourteenth Centuries, New York, 1925, pl. 419B. Several figures in this posture bear images of Amitabha in the crown, while others bear only a main jewel in the tiara; although all appear to grasp the ambrosia-filled bottle, the waters of which will illuminate the laity with bodhi or awareness when sprinkled using a willow-leaf or a feathery fly-whisk.


Compare also one formerly in the Nitta Collection, now in the collection of the National Palace Museum, included in the Museum's exhibition The Crucible of Compassion and Wisdom, Taipei, 1987, pl.79, and another larger figure with similar tribhanga posture, ibid., pl. 81.