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27

Emil Schumacher

OSSIP

Artist's Resale Right

Estimate:

50,000

to
- 70,000 EUR

Property from a Distinguished Private Collection, Germany

Emil Schumacher

Emil Schumacher

OSSIP

OSSIP

Estimate:

50,000

to
- 70,000 EUR

Emil Schumacher

1912 - 1999

OSSIP

signed and dated 58

oil on canvas

80 by 60 cm., 31½ by 23½ in.

Framed: 81.2 by 61.7 cm., 32 by 23⅞ in.

To request a condition report for this lot, please contact Christine.Senft@Sothebys.com.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE

Galerie van de Loo, Munich

Private Collection, Bremen

Acquired from the above by the present owner

Erwin Sylvanus, Emil Schumacher, Recklinghausen 1959, p. 44, illustrated

Hanover, Kestner- Gesellschaft, Emil Schumacher, May - June 1962, no. 48, illustrated

Münster, Westfälischer Kunstverein, Emil Schumacher, January - February 1962, no. 47

Bremen, Kabinett 2, Emil Schumacher, May - June 1976, no. 6

Oldenburg, Kunstverein, Deutsches Informel, 1980

Bremen, Graphisches Kabinett Wolfgang Werner, Appel, Baumeister, Dubuffet, Jorn, Michaux, Schumacher, Tapies, Wols, November 1983 - February 1984, no. 18, illustrated in colour

Berlin, Kunsthandel Wolfgang Werner, Appel, Baumeister, Götz, Jorn, Nay, Schumacher, Sonderborg, Wotruba, May - July 2004, p. 10, illustrated in colour

Together with Heinrich Siepmann, Ernst Hermanns and Gustav Deppe, Schumacher founded the artist’s association Junger Westen in 1947. Their intention was to restore the connections to modern art that were lost in Germany during the National Socialist era and to find within their framework their own forms of artistic expression rooted in the industrially shaped region of the Ruhr and Rhein. Like the other artists of Junger Westen, Schumacher made a new start after the second world war and seeking for a new style. He found it in the Informal, non-objective paintings of the École de Paris and Tachisme, which had their origins in France, and in American Action Painting. He soon became one of the first German artists to adapt this style.


The present work belongs to the first of the artist’s informal period works which lead to his international breakthrough at the 29th Venice Biennale, held in 1958. There his works were exhibited in the German pavilion amongst other artists like Karl Otto Götz, Wassily Kandinsky and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff. The source of his inspiration for his early works was drawn from nature. He reshaped the forms in his mind, giving them a new physicality with his pastos application of colours, arches and lines as well as furrowed fields. OSSIP is a sublime example of Schumacher’s championing abstract art, with the paint thickly applied layer upon layer, resulting in the flat structure of the canvas being impacted giving it a relief like look.


The enigmatic title of the work OSSIP, a version of the name Josef common in Easter European Judaism, challenges dialogues and plays with the viewer’s imagination. According to the painter’s conception the works speak through themselves and reveal after prolonged contemplation that there is no need for an explanation by the artist.


The bright, offset ground field is drawn in from the edge of the work and is spared of the geometric abstractions visible in Schumacher’s earlier works. In this portrait format composition, the broad greenish-grey ground tone is openly visible especially in the margins. The colour field is overlaid by a different coloured stain application in warm olive, light and cooler green and grey tones, as well as sheer white tones and red all traversed by black lines of different thickness.