View full screen - View 1 of Lot 90. The Dachstein seen from the Sophienplatz.
90

Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller

The Dachstein seen from the Sophienplatz

Property from a Distinguished European Collection

Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller

Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller

The Dachstein seen from the Sophienplatz

The Dachstein seen from the Sophienplatz

Property from a Distinguished European Collection

Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller

Vienna 1793 - Baden 1865

The Dachstein seen from the Sophienplatz


signed and dated lower center: Waldmüller 1834

oil on panel

panel: 12 ⅜ by 10 ¼ in.; 31.5 by 26 cm.

framed: 19 by 17 in.; 48.2 by 43.1 cm.

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Galerie Gsell, until 1872;
Dipl. Ing. Süttinger, Vienna;
Private Collection, Switzerland;
With Galerie Sanct Lucas, Vienna;
There acquired by the present collector 24 March 2009.
B. Grimschitz, Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, catalogue raisonné, Salzburg 1957, no. 378;
K.A. Schröder, F.G. Waldmüller, exhibition catalogue, Vienna 1990, p. 99, cat. no. 33;
R. Feuchtmüller, F. G. Walmüller, catalogue raisonné, Vienna 1996, no. 424 (illustrated);
G. Frodl, Wiener Malerei der Biedermeierzeit, Rosenheim 1997, p. 120, cat. no. 120.

The magnificent vista depicts a view of the Dachstein, a group of peaks in the Eastern Alps in Austria. Through his appreciation of artists from previous generations, Waldmüller had the ability to portray nature in an honest and breathtaking manner. His use of color and shading portray a landscape of varied topography where each hill and mountain could serve as the subject of its own painting yet Waldmüller effortlessly brings them together in a unified composition. He layers the landscape in such a way that not only adds dimensionality to the composition but creates a sense of texture and visual interest. 


During the 1830s in which he painted the above composition, many consider it to be a pivotal decade from the perspective of both output and subject. Unlike fellow contemporary artists, Waldmüller moved away from the Romantic style of landscape painting and opted for a more authentic reflection of what he saw. This attitude reflects the development of the Biedermeier style and the growing importance of the middle-classes in the realm of society and art. The result: accessible, peaceful subjects that appealed to a wider audience that would later become a source of Austrian identity for future generations.


For biographical information of the artist, please see lot 88.