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12

Pseudo Jacopino, circa 1335 - 1340

Crucifixion with Saints and Archangel Michael above

Estimate:

300,000 - 400,000 USD

Property from a Distinguished Private Collection

Pseudo Jacopino, circa 1335 - 1340

Pseudo Jacopino, circa 1335 - 1340

Crucifixion with Saints and Archangel Michael above

Crucifixion with Saints and Archangel Michael above

Estimate:

300,000 - 400,000 USD

Property from a Distinguished Private Collection

Pseudo Jacopino, circa 1335 - 1340

active in Bologna, circa 1325 - 1350/60

Crucifixion with Saints and Archangel Michael above


tempera on panel, gold ground, with an arched top

16 7/8 by 13 1/4 in.; 42.9 by 33.6 cm.

The following condition report has been provided by Karen Thomas of Thomas Art Conservation LLC., 119 West 23rd Street, Suite 400, New York, NY 10011, 212-564-4024, info@thomasartconservation.com, an independent restorer who is not an employee of Sotheby's.


The dimensions of the panel appear largely intact, although the original edges are not preserved and the back has been thinned. There is a significant amount of old woodworm damage. Two old cracks, one in the center and one in the upper proper right, have been repaired with modern wood inserts on the reverse. The panel is relatively flat.

The gilding is very worn.

The paint layers are better preserved, especially in the lighter areas. Some wear can be seen in the red lake glazes. There is scattered retouching throughout, notably of a long vertical crack near the left edge, in Christ's arms, and in the lower part of the mourning St. John. A limited amount of mechanical damage can also be observed.

The varnish is clear and the surface gloss even.

The later frame is in generally good condition. It shows wear to the molding and the high points of the pastiglia decoration.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Please refer to the online cataloging for additional literature.
Chalandon collection, Château de Grange Blanche, Parcieux, Near Lyon;
With Giovanni Salocchi, Florence, by 1953;
G. Riva, Milan;
With ArtInvest Ltd.;
There acquired by the present owner, 2014. 

A. Volpe, "Aggiunte al 'Maestro dei polittici di Bologna,'" in Bollettino dei Musei Civici d’Arte Antica 6 (2007): pp. 26-27, reproduced p. 27, fig. 11 (as Master of the Bologna Polyptychs);

D. Benati, "Nuovi dipinti su tavola negli anni di Bertrando del Poggetto," in Giotto e Bologna, ed. M. Medica, Cinisello Balsamo 2010, pp. 79-85.

Active in the first half of the fourteenth century in Bologna, the still-anonymous artist known as Pseudo Jacopino was an important figure among the first generation of Bolognese painters in the days of Giotto. Roberto Longhi first identified Jacopino di Francesco, an artist active in the third quarter of the fourteenth century in Pavia, Lombardy, and Bologna.1 However the group of paintings that Longhi associated with Jacopino were later proven to date decades earlier, thus the "Pseudo" was added to this earlier Jacopino's name to differentiate the two artists. A seminal figure in the development of Bolognese trecento painting, the Pseudo Jacopino derived influence from Riminese painters and early Bolognese manuscript illustrations. Several phases of his career have been delineated by more recent scholars, and to the latest phase belong a group of polyptychs that suggest the work of another hand (sometimes referred to as the Master of the Bologna Polyptychs).2


The iconography of this devotional panel unites the moment of Christ’s death on the cross with the Last Judgment presided over by St. Michael, shown above the cross holding scales containing human souls and fending off a black demon representing Satan. The figures are represented hieratically, with Christ and the four central saints appearing larger than the diminutive Mary Magdalene at the foot of the cross, yet the Pseudo Jacopino imbued the scene with human emotion as well. While the patron saints, John the Baptist and a Franciscan saint, hold their attributes and gaze stoically at the viewer, the Virgin and St. John the Evangelist are filled with anguish, as seen in their distorted facial expressions and tense hand gestures. The roundels depicting Saints Mark and John suggest that this panel belonged to a diptych or had a pendant panel that would have included the remaining two Evangelists.


1. R. Longhi, “La pittura del Trecento nell’Italia settentrionale,” 1934-5, reprinted in Opera Completa: Lavori in Valpadana, vol. 6, 1973, pp. 60-62; 73-76.

2. See A. Caleca, “Pseudo Jacopino di Francesco,” in La pittura in Italia, Il Duecento e il Trecento, 1986, vol. II, p. 654; R. Gibbs, “Pseudo-Jacopino,” in Grove Dictionary of Art.