View full screen - View 1 of Lot 569. Angel of the Annunciation; Virgin of the Annunciation: a pair.
569

Attributed to Jacopo da Ponte, called Jacopo Bassano

Angel of the Annunciation; Virgin of the Annunciation: a pair

Estimate:

20,000

to
- 30,000 USD

Attributed to Jacopo da Ponte, called Jacopo Bassano

Attributed to Jacopo da Ponte, called Jacopo Bassano

Angel of the Annunciation; Virgin of the Annunciation: a pair

Angel of the Annunciation; Virgin of the Annunciation: a pair

Estimate:

20,000

to
- 30,000 USD

Lot sold:

81,900

USD

Attributed to Jacopo da Ponte, called Jacopo Bassano

Bassano del Grappa circa 1510 - 1592

Angel of the Annunciation; Virgin of the Annunciation: a pair


a pair, both oil on canvas

each canvas: 38 1/2 by 17 1/4 in.; 97.8 by 43.8 cm.

each framed: 41 by 20 in.; 104.1 by 50.8 cm.

2

The canvases are both unlined and stable on their stretchers. The images read well beneath a varnish that seems to have discolored. A few areas of abrasion or loss are visible on both canvases, such as a triangular scratch above the angel's legs and a few abraded patches on the Virgin's clothing and the left background, but none of these are distracting. The rough weave of the canvas is visible through the paint surface, and thicker areas of varnish around the edges in particular are causing slight buckling of the canvas on both paintings. Under UV inspection, the varnish appears thick on both canvases and is difficult to read through, but currently only a very few small spots fluoresce, and the aforementioned losses or scratches fluoresce unevenly. Older retouching seems to be present in some of the folds of the Virgin's cloak. Offered in matching simple wooden frames.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

This pair of unpublished and unlined canvases depicts the Annunciation to the Virgin in luminous tones of pink, yellow and white, and in a style remarkably close to the work of Jacopo Bassano at the height of his career. Professor Peter Humfrey, to whom we are grateful, dates the pair to circa 1550-1555 and believes they once decorated organ shutters in a provincial church. In this period of Jacopo’s oeuvre, he was beginning to experiment with nocturnes, a theme which is suggested here by the darkness in the niche behind the angel Gabriel and the bright light of the dove of the Holy Spirit over the Virgin’s head. Though organ shutter doors were typically larger than the size of these canvases, the pairing of the Angel Gabriel on the left and the Virgin on the right was a common subject for organ shutters, and the unusual size may reflect their use on a smaller organ in a parish church. The stone niche settings behind each figure would create the illusion of real architectural elements when seen from below, and the way Gabriel’s foot and Mary’s drapery extend almost outside of the picture plane support this viewpoint as well.