View full screen - View 1 of Lot 175. An impressive and rare large lacquer-gilt bronze figure of Avalokitesvara, Ming dynasty | 明 漆金銅觀音菩薩坐像.
175

An impressive and rare large lacquer-gilt bronze figure of Avalokitesvara, Ming dynasty | 明 漆金銅觀音菩薩坐像

UK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

150,000 - 250,000 GBP

Property from an English Private Collection

An impressive and rare large lacquer-gilt bronze figure of Avalokitesvara, Ming dynasty | 明 漆金銅觀音菩薩坐像

An impressive and rare large lacquer-gilt bronze figure of Avalokitesvara, Ming dynasty | 明 漆金銅觀音菩薩坐像

Estimate:

150,000 - 250,000 GBP

Lot sold:

189,000

GBP

Property from an English Private Collection

An impressive and rare large lacquer-gilt bronze figure of Avalokitesvara

Ming dynasty

明 漆金銅觀音菩薩坐像


well cast, serenely seated in dhyanasana with both hands raised in an animated gesture, dressed in a long robe with hems decorated with floral scrolls falling in voluminous folds over the legs, tied at the waist with a double-knot, the well-defined face with a gentle smile, the hair gathered into a high-chignon, framed by an elaborate headdress in openwork centred by the Amitabha Buddha 

The dating of this lot is consistent with the result of a thermoluminescence test, Oxford Authentication Ltd, no. C121g41.

Height 62.5 cm, 24⅝ in.


Some general wear to the surface and small chips to the edges overall. A ca. 9 cm wide casting flaw/hole to the upper left side on the back of the figure, along with two cracks to the right side. The right knee also has two small casting flaw/holes (ca. 1 and 0.3 cm). A few parts along the edges of the crown are missing as is the attribute in the figure's right hand.


中文內容僅供參考,請以英文原版為準。表面有磨痕,邊沿有小磕。坐像後側左上方有一鑄造瑕疵/孔洞,約9公分,右側另有兩道裂。右膝亦有兩處鑄造瑕疵/孔洞(各約1公分、0.3公分)。頭冠邊沿有局部缺失,右手原持法器亦缺失。


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby’s is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD “AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.


我們很高興為您提供上述拍品狀況報告。由於敝公司非專業修復人員,在此敦促您向其他專業修復人員索取諮詢,以獲得更詳盡、專業之報告。

準買家應該檢查每款拍品以確認其狀況,蘇富比所作的任何陳述均為專業主觀看法而非事實陳述。準買家應參考有關該拍賣的重要通知(見圖錄)。

雖然本狀況報告或有針對某拍品之討論,但所有拍賣品均根據印於圖錄內之業務規則以拍賣時狀況出售。

Acquired in Hong Kong in 2000.

於2000年購自香港

This splendid gilt-bronze Buddhist sculpture shows the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara in a very unusual representation, with no closely related piece appearing to have been recorded. Modestly dressed in a garment, which covers most of his body, and without any jewellery except for the crown, which indicates his identity as the earthly manifestation of Amitabha Buddha, this bodhisattva Avalokitesvara is noticeably different from many of its counterparts. Although his broad and flat face is essentially consistent in its general style with other late Ming figures, his wide-open eyes are distinctive, when compared to the more commonly found downcast expression. Avalokitesvara figures of the time typically reveal their bare chests and feet and wear elaborate jewellery such as earrings and necklaces: see, for example, a more heavily ornamented figure attributed to the 16th or 17th century, seated in dhyanasana on a lotus pedestal but shown with his upturned feet, in the collection of the Chang Foundation, illustrated in James Spencer, Buddhist Images in Gilt Metal, Taipei, 1993, pl. 39.


Avalokitesvara, ‘Guanyin’ in Chinese, is one of the most beloved bodhisattvas in China. The Buddhist scripture Lotus Sutra, first translated in Chinese in AD 286, describes the bodhisattva as the lord who compassionately provides release and deliverance to all those that suffer. Since around the Southern and Northern Dynasties (420-589), when Buddhism was embraced by various courts, gilt-bronze images of Avalokitesvara became popular and continued to be produced in different styles in later centuries. The present piece, with a strap holding the garments as is usually seen holding monks’ robes, and without jewellery, appears to portray the bodhisattva as a male figure, while figures of Avalokitesvara of the 16th and 17th centuries tend to show more feminine features.


Compare two examples with related elements, both seated in dhyanasana and with hands in similar mudras; a slightly larger one attributed to the 16th or 17th century, wearing a similar crown and no jewellery as the present lot, but with a wan symbol on his chest, sold in these rooms, 13th December 1960, lot 119; and a slightly smaller piece, also crowned with a related five-point diadem, but adorned with ornaments hanging down from his ears and neck, sold as part of a pair at Christie’s Hong Kong, 30th October 1994, lot 396.


The dating of the figure is consistent with the result of Oxford Authentication thermoluminescence analysis report no. C121g41.