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64

Feynman, Richard P. Autograph Manuscript On Particle Physics, With Original Drawing By Feynman, Ca. 1980

Estimate:

10,000 - 15,000 USD

Property From The Family Of Richard P. Feynman

Feynman, Richard P. Autograph Manuscript On Particle Physics, With Original Drawing By Feynman, Ca. 1980

Feynman, Richard P. Autograph Manuscript On Particle Physics, With Original Drawing By Feynman, Ca. 1980

Estimate:

10,000 - 15,000 USD

Lot sold:

11,340

USD

Property From The Family Of Richard P. Feynman

Feynman, Richard P. 

"Excelsior....Kinds of questions...Products Distribution...", ca 1980.


Autograph manuscript, 1 p (8 1/2 x 11 inches) in black ink on plain white wove paper watermarked "CBA Western College Bookstore Association," ca 1972. 2-inch closed tear to right edge with no loss, creases at upper right corner, original pen drawing at upper right corner, being a sketch of a man in a sun hat and sunglasses, with a flag reading "Excelsior."


A very rare example of the collision of Feynman's two great interests; physics and art. Only one other example like this has come to market before, being a sheet of calculations embellished with drawings (sold in these rooms, Lot 154, Fine Books & Manuscripts, 17 December 2018). 


In 1962, at the age of 44, Feynman began learning to draw, starting by taking weekly classes at the home of artist/scientist Tom Van Sant. He developed into a talented artist over the years, often working with live models in his home, or simply sketching the people around him, and eventually began signing his works under the pseudonym "Ofey." His artwork has been published in The Art of Richard P. Feynman. Images by a Curious Character." Feynman's famous "Ode to a Flower" was a response to he and his artist friend Jirayr Zorthian's friendly arguments about science vs art:

"I have a friend who's an artist and he's taken a view which I don't agree with very well. He'll hold up a flower and say 'Look how beautiful it is!' and I'll agree. And he says 'You see, I as an artist can see how beautiful this is, but you, as a scientist... oh you take this all apart and it becomes a dull thing.' And I think that he's kind of nutty! First of all, the beauty he sees is available to other people — and me too, I believe... I see much more about the flower than he sees... All kinds of interesting questions which a science knowledge only adds to the excitement and mystery and the awe of a flower. It only adds.... Does it make any less of a beautiful smell of violets to know that it's molecules?" (Sykes, No Ordinary Genius: The Illustrated Richard Feynman, p. 107)

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